Air Force

February 7, 2014

Weapons Airmen bring bombs to fight

Tags:
Senior Airman Benjamin Sutton
366th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

Senior Airman Cameron Delsol, 366th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron lead crew three man and Staff Sgt. Douglas Brown, 366th AMXS lead crew team chief, walk along the flight line at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Jan. 28. The Airmen are more than 3,200 personnel participating in Red Flag 14-1. The premier exercise gives them the opportunity to experience realistic, stressful combat situations in a controlled environment to increase their ability to complete missions and return home.

NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE, Nev.  — The chill morning air and lack of light doesn’t deter Airmen from the 366th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron who are preparing inert munitions for aircraft participating in the combat exercise Red Flag 14-1.

By providing realistic combat training in a contested, degraded and operationally limited environment, Red Flag 14-1 provides pilots with real-time war scenarios and helps ground crews test their readiness capabilities.

“Red Flag is an excellent opportunity for us to receive some seriously realistic training,” said Senior Airman Norman Roope, 366th AMXS weapons load crew member. “We are able to slow down and really focus on proper weapon handling techniques along with safety concerns. It’s easy to get stuck in the monotony of a daily routine back home and being here really revitalizes us and shows the big picture of what we are trying to accomplish as an Air Force.”

Airmen loaded multiple aircraft with GBU-12 inert munitions in preparation for the day’s flying.

Senior Airman Jordan Gee, 366th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron weapons three man, adjusts the pins on an inert GBU-12 munition Jan. 28 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. Gee is one of more than 3,200 military members currently participating in the combat exercise Red Flag 14-1. By providing realistic combat training in a contested, degraded and operationally limited environment, Red Flag 14-1 provides pilots with real-time war scenarios and helps ground crews
test their readiness capabilities.

“Even though they are inert, the rounds still have guidance systems attached in order to give the aircrew a better training opportunity,” said Staff Sgt. Devin Skelton, 366th AMXS load crew team chief. “I want to ensure my team is mission ready. It’s more than just going through the motions; it’s about taking the time to ensure each and every munition is ready to go into the fight, regardless of whether it’s an inert or live round.”

According to Skelton, weapons Airmen don’t load bombs as much as he personally would like to. So loading them almost daily during the exercise is absolutely rewarding training.

“Having the opportunity to participate in Red Flag is fantastic training for future deployments,” said Senior Airman Jordan Gee, 366th AMXS weapons three man. “Being able to work side-by-side with other countries to accomplish the mission is a unique occurrence. Plus, multiple aircraft are going to fly in the next few hours and our jets need to be mission ready. We are responsible for ensuring these munitions are attached safely and correctly so that every player can receive proper training once the bombs are dropped.”

Training was taken up a notch this morning as faulty brackets caused some problems for maintenance Airmen.

“There was a small problem with some brackets attached to the inert munitions and this gave us the opportunity to work with our fellow maintenance Airmen,” said Roope.

“The broken brackets were replaced on the spot and we finished attaching the munitions to the aircraft. Loading the inert rounds also helps everyone get the jitters out so when we load live munitions we are confident and prepared to execute the mission flawlessly.”

Another great aspect of the multinational exercise is the opportunities Airmen have once their work day is complete.

“Being on temporary duty here for the exercise is great,” said Roope. “Standing on the flight line we can see the skyscrapers of Las Vegas and Nellis Air Force Base is amazing. There are so many different kinds of aircraft here as well as the Thunderbirds. I really like to watch the aircraft and ground crews from Britain and Australia doing their jobs because I notice the similarities between our nations. It really shows that no matter where we are from we really are one mission, one fight.”




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Courtesy photograph

Nellis Airman garners 2013 Sijan Award

Courtesy photograph Senior Master Sgt. David DeLoney, 820th RED HORSE readiness and emergency management superintendent, poses for a photo at an undisclosed location. DeLoney earned the 2013 U.S. Air Force Lance P. Sijan Leader...
 
 

April is Child Abuse Prevention Month

NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE, Nev. — Why do I care? I worked for years in Florida in Child Protective Services. I obtained my Master of Social Work in 1996, and I have been a licensed clinical social worker since 2001. I saw children with marks and bruises after they had been beaten with objects. I saw...
 
 

Navy leadership visits Las Vegas Navy Reserves

NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE, Nev. — The Las Vegas Navy Operational Support Center was honored to have Rear Adm. Bryan P. Cutchen, commander of the U.S. Naval Reserve Forces Command, as its special guest speaker during a recently conducted drill weekend. The distinguished guest was a beacon of inspiration for the 250 plus Navy reservists who...
 

 

Pulse on AF force management

WASHINGTON — New eligibility criteria, application deadlines and status updates are all featured in this force management update, an ongoing effort to bring Airmen the latest, most accurate information concerning the complex and dynamic force management programs. Additional TERA, VSP windows The Air Force will open two new fiscal year 2014 temporary early retirement authority...
 
 

AF opens additional TERA, VSP windows

JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO-RANDOLPH, Texas — The Air Force will open two new fiscal year 2014 force management temporary early retirement authority application windows, and a new voluntary separation pay application window, Air Force Personnel Center officials said April 14. Commonly referred to as the 15-year retirement, TERA eligibility will be based on the updated...
 
 
U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Timothy Young

Military children receive support during hardships

U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Timothy Young Tech. Sgt. Mike Hodges, 99th Medical Operations Squadron respiratory therapy technician, holds a horse while Anders Steinhiser, Lomie G. Heard Elementary School 1st grade s...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin