Health & Safety

February 28, 2014

Heart disease deadly but preventable

Senior Airman Matthew Lancaster
99th Air Base Wing Public Affairs

NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE, Nev. — February is American Heart Month, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report approximately 600,000 Americans die from heart disease each year.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women, but heart disease is preventable and controllable when individuals make healthy lifestyle choices and manage their health conditions.

Risk factors are health conditions and lifestyle habits that increase your risk of heart disease. The more risk factors you have, the higher your chances of having a heart disease. According to the American Heart Association, risk factors for heart disease include:

  • High blood pressure
  • Being overweight
  • Physical inactivity
  • Tobacco smoke exposure
  • High blood cholesterol
  • Diabetes
  • Uncontrolled stress
  • Increasing age
  • Family medical history

“Common heart issues include coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure and arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation,” said Maj. (Dr.) Steven Regwan, 99th MDOS chief of cardiology.

While certain risk factors such as age and family history of early heart disease cannot be changed, it is important to understand that you can lower your risk for heart disease.

“To maintain a healthy heart is to maintain a healthy lifestyle through daily aerobic exercises, limiting alcohol intake, smoking cessation and dietary modifications,” said Lynda Le, 99th Medical Operations Squadron cardiology physician assistant. “Patients should [also] have routine checkups, at least annually and screenings if he/she has a family history of heart disease.”

According to Medline Plus, a service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine website, these are additional ways to prevent heart disease:

  • Know your blood pressure to be able to mitigate high blood pressure
  • Get tested for diabetes and if you have it, keep it under control
  • Know your cholesterol and triglyceride levels to make sure you maintain healthy levels
  • Eat a lot of fruits and vegetables
  • Maintain a healthy weight

Regwan suggests doing running, jogging, swimming, biking and any other exercise that increases your heart rate for a sustained period of time.
For more information visit the AHA at http://www.heart.org.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Thomas Spangler

Preventative healthcare: Key to overall wellness

U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Thomas Spangler Mellissa Urban, 99th Medical Group contracted licensed practical nurse, gives a vaccination to Tech. Sgt. Allan Habel, U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds quality assurance inspe...
 
 

F-16Ds removed from flight status due to longeron cracks

WASHINGTON — U.S. Air Force officials recently removed 82 two-seat F-16D Fighting Falcons from flight status due to the discovery of canopy sill longeron cracks found between the front and rear pilot seats. The cracks were discovered following an immediate action time compliance technical order, or TCTO, to inspect all F-16D due to initial structural...
 
 
leadership-edit

Leadership Lessons: Do you know our Air Force Heritage?

GRAND FORKS AIR FORCE BASE, N.D. — On June 28, 1914, the Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife Sophie were assassinated by a Yugoslav nationalist. One month later on July 28, the Austrian-Hungary Empire declared ...
 

 
U.S. Force photo by Staff Sgt. Siuta B. Ika

99th CES ‘plumbers’ keep mission flowing

U.S. Force photo by Staff Sgt. Siuta B. Ika Staff Sgt. Alan Franklin, 99th Civil Engineer Squadron water and fuels systems maintenance craftsman, uses a hand auger, or plumbing snake, to unclog a drain pipe at the Nellis Inn on...
 
 
U.S. Air  Force photo by Senior Airman Christopher Tam

Civil Air Patrol cadets gain insight on Nellis

U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Christopher Tam Maj. Jason Curtis, U.S. Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron no. 6 pilot, interacts with Civil Air Patrol cadets at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Aug. 18. The CAP cadets were...
 
 
U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mikaley Towle

Microchips help return lost furry friends

U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mikaley Towle Dr. Michael Simpson, a Department of Army Civilian Veterinary medical officer, scans ‘P.J.,’ a military working dog, for a microchip number at the Nellis Veterinary Tre...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin