Air Force

May 2, 2014

AF top Airman gives insight to budget decisions

Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Mark A. Welsh III speaks at the National Press Club in Washington, April 23. Welsh provided attendees a glimpse into the future of the Air Force and completed a question and answer session to conclude the breakfast.

WASHINGTON — “The demand for what the Air Force provides is on the rise; unfortunately, the supply is going in the other direction,” said Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Mark A. Welsh III.

Welsh spoke to members of the National Press Club about tough choices the Air Force has had to make in the face of budgetary constraints, during a breakfast April 23 here.

“Every recommendation we’re making these days does hurt,” Welsh said. “It’s taking capability or capacity away from combatant commanders. We’re figuring out how to wisely move forward, keeping our Air Force balanced as we downsize it over time. We’re reducing capability in every one of our core mission areas, that’s the reality of it — every, single one.”

Welsh described many behind-the-scenes activities and operations, which typically go unseen by most Airmen and the public.

“When you walk into a room and you look at a light switch on the wall, unless you’re an electrician, you really don’t have idea what’s behind the wall,” he said. “But every time you flip the switch, the light comes on; every, single time. That’s kind of the way our Air Force is. We don’t do a whole lot of things in the world that are visible to you every day.”

Welsh highlighted the key mission areas in which Airmen operate on a daily basis, and the analytical processes used to determine where to make necessary cuts with the least mission impact.

“We’re doing everything we can to maintain that balance between being ready to do the nation’s business today, and being capable of doing it ten years from now,” Welsh said. “It’s hard to make a $20 billion reduction per year without making some significant change. Trimming around the edges as we make our budget proposal just wasn’t going to work. We had to look at some pretty dramatic things.”

One of the dramatic changes is the proposed elimination of the A-10 Thunderbolt II fleet.

“It’s not emotional, it’s logical; it’s analytical,” Welsh explained. “It makes eminent sense from a military perspective, if you have to make these kinds of cuts. Nobody likes it.”

He described the process of getting to the conclusion of cutting one of the Air Force’s most beloved airplanes, and one that he has flown. To find the same $4.2 billion savings in air superiority; intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance; global airlift and command and control posed unacceptable risks to all service chiefs and combatant commanders, Welsh said.

“So we looked at all those options,” he said. “We took each one independently and we ran it through an operational analysis, and we came very clearly to the conclusion that of all those horrible options, the least operationally impactful was to divest the A-10 fleet. That’s how we got there.”

Welsh said to achieve the same monetary savings of divesting the A-10 fleet, it would take about 363 F-16 Fighting Falcons out of the fight.

“Everything in this entire chain of events is hard,” he said. “The balance is pretty delicate; the cuts are real. The issues are serious, and they deserve serious consideration.”

Although the financial climate, coupled with a growing and evolving threat environment, puts additional strain on all branches of the nation’s military, Welsh expressed his confidence in the capabilities of the Airmen in his charge.

“This is a fascinating time to be in the U.S. military, and it’s a great time to be an American Airman,” he said. “Your Airmen are very proud of who they are; they’re incredibly proud of what they do, and they’re incredibly good at doing it.”




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
U.S. Air Force photo by Henry Hancock

Weapons school grad challenges Airmen as new AU commander

U.S. Air Force photo by Henry Hancock Lt. Gen. Steven Kwast, Air University commander and 1994 outstanding graduate from Fighter Weapons School at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., addresses Airmen Nov. 12 at Maxwell-Gunter Air Forc...
 
 

AF closes FY14 force management programs

WASHINGTON — Airmen who met the service’s reduction in force board were notified of the board’s results Nov. 19, bringing the fiscal 2014 force management programs to an end. The RIF board selected 354 captains and majors across the Air Force for non-retention, half of the number the service previously projected it would separate. Line...
 
 
Courtesy graphic

Blowing away ashes

Courtesy graphic Tobacco use remains the single largest preventable cause of disease and premature death in the U.S., yet more than 45 million Americans still smoke cigarettes. However, more than half of these smokers have atte...
 

 

479 selected for CMSgt promotion

JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO-RANDOLPH, Texas – Of the 2,525 senior master sergeants eligible for promotion to chief, 479 were selected for an 18.97 percent selection rate, Air Force Personnel Center officials announced today. To see the selection list, go to the Air Force Portal at https://my.af.mil, or myPers at https://mypers.af.mil. Airmen will be able to access their score...
 
 
U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Christian Clausen

Creech chiefs welcome finest Airmen into top enlisted tier

U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Christian Clausen Senior Master Sgt. Matthew Saugstad, center left, poses with his wife Senior Master Sgt. Carissa Saugstad, Chief Master Sgt. Butch Brien, 432nd Wing command chief, and ...
 
 
U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Siuta B. Ika

Creech commandeers career counseling capability

U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Siuta B. Ika Senior Master Sgt. Tonya Joyce (left) and Master Sgt. Marcy Holland, both 99th Force Support Squadron career assistance advisors, are available to help Airmen stationed in Souther...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin