Air Force

July 25, 2014

Fuels management flight takes on Red Flag 14-3 full force

Tags:
Airman 1st Class Rachel Loftis
99th Air Base Wing Public Affairs

Senior Airman Daniel Millard, 419th Logistics Readiness Squadron fuels journeyman, prepares to fuel an aircraft participating in Red Flag 14-3, July 22, at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. During Red Flag 14-3, Nellis is housing approximately 280 aircraft that are participating in the exercise, which depending on the aircraft, require anywhere between 800 to 1,500 gallons of fuel per aircraft for each flight, to be operational.

NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE, Nev. – Just like the human body relies on the heart to pump life-sustaining blood to every cell to function, the 99th Logistics Readiness Squadron Fuels Management Flight pumps nourishing fuel to keep aircraft functioning. The role of the fuels flight is critical during Red Flag exercises.

“During a regular day, the 99th LRS fuels flight pumps approximately 150,000 gallons of fuel a day to keep the aircraft functioning; however, during Red Flag it easily exceeds 500,000 to a million gallons a day,” said Senior Airman James Crandle, 99th LRS Fuels Management Flight fuels accountant.

“This [exercise] is the closest you can get to a deployed environment; we have numerous people and personalities, numerous airframes typical bases don’t see, as well as [numerous and] different operations,” Crandle said. “Not only is it good for our pipeline teams to learn and see all this diversity, it’s also good for all the people from other bases who may not get to see this kind of operations tempo or these operation [types].”

“With Red Flag, the day-to-day operations [increase significantly],” Crandle said. “There are a lot of different people, a lot of different moving parts, and we coordinate all of that.”
During Red Flag, the 99th LRS fuels flight received 30 different petroleum oil and lubricant augmented troops from the reserve, guard and active duty components from different bases around the world.

“We integrate the POL troops into our flight,” said Staff Sgt. Roberto Flores 99th LRS Fuels Management Flight fuels distribution supervisor. “We have a 24-hour period to get [POL troops] competent and up to speed with the operations here to be able to support the Nellis mission.”

Nellis AFB has 169 assigned aircraft; however during this Red Flag that number is increased by approximately 115.

“We’re [responsible during Red Flag] for a lot of [people], trucks and fuel, so it’s a lot of different components we have to make sure are in the right place at the right time,” Flores said. “With more people, comes more personalities, with more personalities, means more attention [to detail] that we need to possess.”

Due to the fast-paced environment of Red Flag, there is a lot of movement and personnel to coordinate on the flight line. The 99th LRS Fuels Management Flight has to ensure delivery of fuel to every aircraft, as well as ensure ground vehicles have fuel support.

Red Flag is a prime example of well-rounded training for possible deployment scenarios for the 99th LRS fuels flight.

The 99th LRS fuels management flight is an integral part of the functionality of Red Flag as well as everyday flight line activities. The world’s premier combat training exercise wouldn’t be possible without the hard work of the 99th LRS Fuels Management Flight.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Joshua Kleinholz

31st TES F-35s take on Green Flag 15-08

U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Joshua Kleinholz Tactical air control party members from the 7th Air Support Operations Squadron, Fort Bliss, Texas, monitor radios from a defensive fighting position while AH-64D Apache he...
 
 
U.S. Air Force photo by Susan Garcia

USAF Weapons School JTAC graduates to receive hallowed patches

U.S. Air Force photo by Susan Garcia Master Sgt. Jared Pietras, left, U.S. Air Force Weapons School Joint Terminal Attack Controller Advanced Instructor Course instructor, and Tech. Sgt. James Larsen, JTAC AIC student, pass tar...
 
 

Leaders: Good, bad, forgotten

JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO-RANDOLPH, Texas — It’s been my Air Force experience there are three categories of leaders — the good, bad, and the forgotten.Everyone reading this probably thinks they’re in the first category, but we know that’s not the case. Airmen who work for you certainly wish that were true, but not every leader’s...
 

 

Are you ready to transition out of your uniform?

VANCE AIR FORCE BASE, Okla. — Leaving the military is not as simple as staying home the day after your service commitment is up. Almost 23 years ago, after a summer vacation that lasted less than 48 hours, I showed up in Colorado Springs, Colorado, with about 1,000 of my new closest friends. Fast forward...
 
 
561st-Patch

561st JTS enhances warfighter TTPs

NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE, Nev. — Nellis AFB is home to many groups and squadrons with important mission capabilities that make the U.S. Air Force the most flexible and capable force possible. The 561st Joint tactics Squadron is ...
 
 
U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jake Carter

Airman’s Attic provides free items, goods

U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jake Carter Patrons at the Airman’s Attic look through the store’s inventory on Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., June 18. The Airman’s Attic is a volunteer-based organization where Air...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>