Space

April 3, 2012

NASA, SpaceX announce NASA social for Falcon 9 launch attempt

NASA and Space Exploration Technologies will invite 50 of their social media followers to a two-day NASA Social April 29-30 at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

The event is expected to culminate in the launch of SpaceX’s second Commercial Orbital Transportation Services demonstration flight. SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket is targeted to lift off at 12:22 p.m., EDT, April 30, in an attempt to become the first commercial company to send a spacecraft to the International Space Station.

Registration opens at noon, EDT, April 5, and closes at noon April 6. Fifty participants will be selected from online registrations.

For more information on NASA Social and to register, visit http://www.nasa.gov/social.

A NASA Social is an event for people who use NASA’s social media accounts. For this event, fans and followers on Twitter, Facebook and Google+ are eligible to register. Participants will have unique in-person experiences with SpaceX and NASA, which they are encouraged to share with others through their favorite social network. Guests will view the launch, tour NASA facilities at Kennedy, speak with representatives from both organizations, view the SpaceX launch pad, meet fellow space enthusiasts who are active on social media, and meet members of SpaceX and NASA’s social media teams.

SpaceX will launch its Dragon spacecraft atop its Falcon 9 launch vehicle to test and prove its systems for a rendezvous with the space station. The flight’s objectives include a fly-under of the station to validate operation of sensors and flight systems necessary for a safe rendezvous, berthing to the station and returning the Dragon spacecraft to Earth.

Because portions of this event may take place in restricted areas, registration is limited to U.S. citizens.

Since 2006, NASA’s COTS program has invested financial and technical resources to stimulate private sector efforts to develop and demonstrate safe, reliable and cost-effective space transportation capabilities. In a multi-phase strategy, the program spurs the innovation and development of new spacecraft and launch vehicles from commercial industry to create a new system of delivering cargo to low-Earth orbit and the space station.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
nasa-astronaut

Astronaut Stephen Frick retires from NASA

Astronaut Stephen Frick has retired from NASA to accept a position in the private sector. Frick, who flew as both a shuttle pilot and commander, left the Agency July 13. Steve has been a great asset to the astronaut office and ...
 
 
NASA/JPL-CalTech/R. Hurt photograph

NASA’s Kepler mission discovers bigger, older cousin to Earth

NASA/JPL-CalTech/R. Hurt photograph This size and scale of the Kepler-452 system compared alongside the Kepler-186 system and the solar system. Kepler-186 is a miniature solar system that would fit entirely inside the orbit of ...
 
 
NASA photograph by A. Gemignani

Launch, docking returns ISS crew to full strength

NASA photograph by A. Gemignani The Soyuz TMA-17M rocket launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan July 22, 2015 carrying Expedition 44 Soyuz Commander Oleg Kononenko of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), F...
 

 
NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI photograph

NASA’s New Horizons team finds haze, flowing ice on Pluto

NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI photograph Pluto sends a breathtaking farewell to New Horizons. Backlit by the sun, Pluto’s atmosphere rings its silhouette like a luminous halo in this image taken by NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft around ...
 
 
NASA photograph

NASA satellite camera provides ‘EPIC’ view of Earth

NASA photograph Earth as seen on July 6, 2015, from a distance of one million miles by a NASA scientific camera aboard the Deep Space Climate Observatory spacecraft. A NASA camera on the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) ...
 
 
NASA/JHUAPL/SWRI photograph

NASA’s New Horizons discovers frozen plains in heart of Pluto’s ‘heart’

In the center left of Pluto’s vast heart-shaped feature – informally named “Tombaugh Regio” — lies a vast, craterless plain that appears to be no more than 100 million years old, and is possibly still being shaped...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>