Veterans

April 18, 2012

Military association calls on Congress to stop war on TRICARE

The National Association for Uniformed Services strongly opposes the Pentagon plan for steep increases in TRICARE fees.

The federal fiscal year 2013 defense proposal would raise fees for all programs in TRICARE, the military health care plan.

“It’s an outrage to hear DOD tell military retirees that the costs for promised benefits are squeezing out available resources for our national defense,” said retired Marine Lt. Gen. Jack Klimp, NAUS president and CEO. “NAUS is compelled to protect those who served to protect us,” Klimp said.

“After a career of defending our citizens and our freedom, these brave men and women should not have to fight to keep the nation’s side of its obligation.”

Under the Pentagon’s plan, TRICARE Prime annual enrollment fees for a family would jump nearly four-fold over five years. A rapidly growing enrollment fee would be initiated for TRICARE Standard and one would be imposed for the first time on TRICARE for Life, too. Pharmacy copays would increase to $34 per prescription from $9. And beneficiaries would pay $3 billion more next year for their healthcare benefits they sacrificed in armed service to earn.

“Congress has a unique responsibility to act – indeed it has a moral obligation,” the NAUS president said. “TRICARE is an earned benefit. It is an integral part of a moral contract, a practical fulfillment of a nation’s promise to those who honorably served a career in the Uniformed Services.”

The NAUS chief executive asks Congress to stop the war on TRICARE, “Protect those who served to protect you. They paid a personal price to earn their benefits. Don’t break faith.”

NAUS is a nonprofit, non-partisan association dedicated to protecting the interests of – and benefits earned by – members of the uniformed services for themselves, their families and survivors. NAUS provides administrative support to the Society of Military Widows.

For more information, visit the association’s web site at www.NAUS.org.

 




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Headlines May 1, 2015

Business: Airbus says it will file criminal complaint over U.S. spy claims - European aviation and aeronautics giant Airbus said April 30 it would file a criminal complaint against persons unknown following German media reports it had become a target of U.S. industrial espionage. Finmeccanica outlines way ahead in U.K. market - Details have emerged about how...
 
 

News Briefs May 1, 2015

U.S. commander says NATO to step up its intelligence-sharing The top U.S. commander for NATO says the alliance will begin to improve intelligence-sharing with members and cooperation about the movement of foreign fighters from Iraq and Syria to the U.S. and other Western countries. Air Force Gen. Philip Breedlove says individual nations have been sharing...
 
 
Photograph by Linda KC Reynolds

A Million Makes a Difference

Presidential Lifetime Achievement Awards were presented to Lockheed Martin employees Richard Heinstedt and Jerry Dougherty, for serving more than 4,000 hours since 2003. Sherry Imil (center) received an honorable mention for vo...
 

 
Home-for-Good-logo

Coalition comes together to house area’s homeless vets

A coalition of Antelope Valley social service and community organizations has banded together with the ambitious goal of housing the area’s homeless veteran population by December 2015. The initiative, dubbed Home for Good, h...
 
 

Airbus profit up on Dassault sale but orders down

European planemaker Airbus says it has seen its profit jump in the first quarter thanks to the sale of a stake in rival Dassault Aviation, though its plane orders and deliveries fell slightly. Airbus reported net profit of 792 million euros ($871 million) in the first quarter, compared with 439 million euros a year earlier....
 
 
Air Force photograph by SSgt. DeNoris A. Mickle

‘Sentient data’ may one day augment Soldier capability

Air Force photograph by SSgt. DeNoris A. Mickle Air Force photograph by SSgt. DeNoris A. Mickle “Sentient data,” or information that can feel and perceive things, might one day protect Soldiers and their networks, s...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>