Tech

April 25, 2012

NASA releases call for phase II visionary advanced concepts

The NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts Program is seeking proposals to continue promising studies for which it has supported the first phase.

These cutting-edge concepts have the potential to transform future exploration missions, enable new capabilities, or significantly alter current approaches to launching, building, and operating aerospace systems.

“These transformative concepts have the potential to mature into the new capabilities NASA needs for the challenging space missions in its future,” said Michael Gazarik, director of NASA’s Space Technology Program at NASA Headquarters in Washington.

NIAC projects are chosen based on their character as innovative and visionary, technically substantiated, and very early in development – 10 years or more from use in a mission. NIAC’s current diverse portfolio represents multiple technology areas, including power, propulsion, structures, and avionics.

“We are thrilled to be launching Phase II, so the 2012 NIAC portfolio can feature the most exciting combination of new ideas and continued development,” said Jay Falker, NIAC program executive at NASA Headquarters.

The call for proposals follows last summer’s inaugural selection of Phase I concepts, which are now under study. NIAC will be accepting proposals of no more than 20 pages until June 6.

NASA expects to fund between five and nine Phase II studies this year. The number of awards will depend on the strength of proposals and availability of appropriated funds. Awardees will receive up to $500,000 over two years to further analyze and develop their innovative concepts and help create new avenues for future NASA missions.

Selection announcements are expected in August. This limited solicitation is only for continuing NIAC Phase I concepts. Phase II proposals are eligible based on any current Phase I studies, or any prior Phase I studies from the original NASA Institute for Advanced Concepts that did not complete Phase II.

NASA’s early investment and partnership with creative scientists, engineers and citizen inventors from across the nation will pay huge technological dividends and help maintain America’s leadership in the global technology economy. NIAC is part of NASA’s Space Technology Program, managed by the Office of the Chief Technologist.

To view this research announcement and for more information about NIAC and NASA’s Space Technology Program, visit http://go.usa.gov/R1N.

 




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

ONR features technology for Marines of future

From virtual training to laser weapons, the Office of Naval Research is showcasing a range of technologies at Modern Day Marine exposition Sept. 23-25 that will prepare Marines as they continue to face an increasingly complex security landscape. ONR program officers will be in booth no. 2305 during the event, held at Marine Corps Base...
 
 
University of Alaska-Fairbanks photograph by Chris Larsen

NASA airborne campaigns focus on climate impacts in Arctic

University of Alaska-Fairbanks photograph by Chris Larsen Changes in more than 130 Alaskan glaciers are being surveyed by scientists at the University of Alaska-Fairbanks in a DHC-3 Otter as part of NASA’s multi-year Oper...
 
 
NASA/SSAI photograph by Edward Winstead

ACCESS II confirms jet biofuel burns cleaner

NASA/ORAU photograph by Richard Moore NASA’s DC-8 research aircraft leads one of the ACCESS II sampler aircraft across the early morning California sky.   Flying high above the California desert, NASA researchers rec...
 

 

Sparks fly as NASA pushes limits of 3-D printing technology

NASA has successfully tested the most complex rocket engine parts ever designed by the agency and printed with additive manufacturing, or 3-D printing, on a test stand at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. NASA engineers pushed the limits of technology by designing a rocket engine injector – a highly complex part that...
 
 
NASA photograph by David Alexander

NASA MQ-9 remotely piloted aircraft completes visual, radar mission in Hawaii

NASA photograph “Ikhana,” NASA’s MQ-9 remotely piloted research aircraft, carries a maritime radar in a specialized centerline pod during a flight to check out systems prior to the aircraft’s deployment ...
 
 
NASA photograph by Tom Tschida

NASA Armstrong’s space shuttle Mate-Demate Device coming down

NASA photograph by Tom Tschida The space shuttle Mate-Demate Device that stood as an iconic symbol of NASA’s now-concluded Space Shuttle Program at NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center for 38 years is being dismantled af...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>