Tech

May 10, 2012

ONR awarding scholarship money to top students at science competition

by Katherine H. Crawford
Arlington, Va.

The Office of Naval Research will award more than $160,000 in scholarships to a group of young scientists and engineers competing at Intel ISEF 2012, May 13-18 in Pittsburgh, Penn.

The Intel International Science and Engineering Fair competition draws more than 1,500 students in grades 9 to 12 to showcase their independent research projects and vie for scholarships contributed by government, industry and academia.

“ONR is actively investing in the future by providing scholarships to these students, who represent some of the best and brightest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics,” said Dr. Anthony Junior, director, Department of the Navy Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions Program office. “They’re exactly the type of sharp, high achievers that we’ll need to solve problems for the Navy, Marine Corps and the nation.”

ONR’s prize money provides $8,000 Tuition Scholarship Awards to 17 top finishers, plus three awards in the amount of $4,000 each to participants with original research in critical, naval-relevant scientific areas, such as electrical engineering, environmental engineering and microbiology. ONR also will present four $4,000 Tuition Scholarship Awards to three individuals and one two-member team to attend the London International Youth Science Forum in August. All recipients also receive a certificate signed by Chief of Naval Research Rear Adm. Matthew Klunder and a miniature Lone Sailor statue.

ONR staff will be at Booth No. 402 to provide information about the organization’s many educational outreach programs.

ONR provides the science and technology necessary to maintain the Navy and Marine Corps’ technological advantage. Through its affiliates, ONR is a leader in science and technology with engagement in 50 states, 30 countries, 1,035 institutions of higher learning and more than 900 industry partners. ONR employs approximately 1,065 people, comprising uniformed, civilian and contract personnel, with additional employees at the Naval Research Lab in Washington, D.C.

 




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