World

May 21, 2012

News Briefs May 21, 2012

Bird strike caused Marine helicopter crash

A Marine Corps investigation has found that a bird strike caused a helicopter crash at Camp Pendleton, Calif., last year that killed two Marines.

The report, obtained by U-T San Diego, says the AH-1W Cobra attack helicopter collided Sept. 19 with a red-tailed hawk that had a wing span of about 4 feet.

According to the report, the hawk hit the top of the helicopter and damaged the pitch change link. Almost immediately after impact, vibrations in the main rotor caused the rotor and top of the transmission to separate from the aircraft.

The helicopter fell in three pieces to the ground and the wreckage ignited a brush fire that burned more than 120 acres.

Investigators say both pilots on board were killed instantly. AP

 

Pentagon sees Chinese military expanding its reach

The Pentagon is telling Congress that China’s increasingly sophisticated military is pursuing “new historic missions” that go beyond its traditional role of defending the homeland.

In a report released May 18, the Pentagon says these new missions include humanitarian aid, combatting piracy and counter-terrorism operations. The Pentagon cited as an example China’s evacuation last year of 36,000 Chinese nationals from Libya during the uprising against Moammar Gadhafi.

The Pentagon report is an annual presentation to Congress on China’s military capabilities.

The report says the main focus of the People’s Liberation Army remains preparing for the possibility of hostilities in the Taiwan Strait. That includes deterring the U.S. from effectively intervening in the event of conflict with Taiwan, which China considers a breakaway province.

China, however, rejected the report.

Foreign Ministry spokesman Hong Lei said May 19 the report made irresponsible comments about China’s legitimate and normal defense development, and demanded that the United States stop issuing the annual report.

Hong said China’s military development is only for self-defense and targets no country. AP




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Constitutional questions grow over Japan PM’s military plans

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s pledge to the U.S. to increase Japan’s military contribution internationally is facing more questions about potential conflicts with the nation’s pacifist Constitution. Opposition lawmakers demanded answers from key Cabinet members at a hearing June 10, after three prominent constitution experts–including one chosen by Abe’s rul...
 
 

Japan, Philippines to talk about transfer of military goods

Japan and the Philippines agreed June 4 to start talks on transferring Japanese military hardware and technology to the Southeast Asian country trying to upgrade its defenses. Tokyo eased restrictions on exports of military equipment and technology last year as part of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s push to expand Japan’s military role abroad. Under a...
 
 

U.S., India move forward on joint military research projects

After several years of bureaucratic delays, the U.S. and India are moving ahead with two joint research projects for the military that officials hope will set the stage for greater defense cooperation in the years ahead. Defense Secretary Ash Carter and Indian Defense Minister Manohar Parrikar signed a defense agreement June 4, as part of...
 

 

Saudi Arabia becomes world’s biggest defense importer

Saudi Arabia has passed India to become the world’s biggest arms importer last year as concerns about Iran’s ambitions increase tensions in the Middle East. Saudi spending rose 54 percent to $6.5 billion last year, while India imported $5.8 billion, according to data released Sunday by IHS, a leading analyst of the global arms trade....
 
 

China defense spending to grow 10.1 percent in 2015

China said March 5 it will boost defense spending by 10.1 percent, a smaller rise than last year but in line with large annual increases that have drawn concern among the country’s neighbors over Beijing’s military and territorial ambitions. Beijing says the higher spending is needed to modernize equipment and improve conditions for the 2.3...
 
 

Kremlin pursues military modernization despite economic woes

Hundreds of new Russian aircraft, tanks and missiles are rolling off assembly lines. Russian jets roar through European skies under NATO’s wary eye. Tens of thousands of troops take part in war games showing off the military’s readiness for all-out war. The muscle flexing suggests that Russia’s economic woes so far are having no impact...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>