Space

May 23, 2012

New NASA App 2.0 released For iPhone, iPod Touch

NASA has released an updated version of the free NASA App for iPhone and iPod touch.

The NASA App 2.0 includes several new features and a completely redesigned user interface that improves the way people can explore and experience NASA content on their mobile devices.

A team at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif., completely rebuilt the NASA App for iPhone and iPod touch. It now has a fast and intuitive interface for the approximately 4.7 million people who’ve downloaded it so far. Other new features of NASA App 2.0 include weather forecasts in the spacecraft sighting opportunities section; maps, information and links to all of the NASA visitor centers; a section about NASA’s programs, as well as the ability to print, save and access favorite items, and bookmark images. The NASA App 2.0 requires iOS 5.0 or later.

“This is our first major redesign of the NASA App for iPhone since our initial release in 2009,” said Jerry Colen, NASA App project manager at Ames. “We are really excited about this release and think users are going to love the new interface and features.”

All of the NASA Apps for iPhone, iPod touch, iPad and Android showcase a wealth of NASA content, including thousands of images, videos on-demand, live streaming of NASA Television, the agency’s Third Rock online radio station, mission and launch information, featured content, stories and breaking news. Users also can find sighting opportunities for the International Space Station and track the position of the orbiting laboratory. App users also easily can share NASA content with their friends and followers on Facebook, Twitter or via email. In total, the apps have been downloaded by more than 8.8 million people.

iPhone, iPod touch, iPad and the Apple App Store are trademarks of Apple Inc. Use of these trademarks is subject to Apple permission. Android is a trademark of Google Inc. Use of this trademark is subject to Google permission.

For more information about the new NASA App 2.0 for iPhone and other NASA Apps, visit http://www.nasa.gov/nasaapp.




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