Space

May 31, 2012

NASA begins development of Space Launch Flight software

Tags:

Marshall engineers Dan Mitchell, left, and Walter Robinson check out the SLS flight computer test beds which were recently delivered to Marshall by Boeing, the SLS Stages prime contractor.

NASA engineers working on the new Space Launch System can now begin developing the advanced, heavy-lift launch vehicle’s flight software using newly delivered software test bed computers from Boeing.

The SLS will launch NASA’s Orion spacecraft and provide an entirely new capability for human exploration beyond Earth’s orbit. Designed to be flexible for crew or cargo missions, SLS and Orion will be safe, affordable, sustainable and continue America’s journey of discovery from the unique vantage point of space.

“We are moving out very quickly on SLS,” said Todd May, Space Launch System Program manager at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. “SLS will be the most powerful launch vehicle ever built, and it requires the most capable flight software in the history of human spaceflight. Having this avionics hardware in place early will allow the NASA SLS team and Boeing to accelerate the flight software development.”

Early delivery of SLS flight software will allow Marshall Center engineers, from left, Kurt Jackson, Ken King, Bob Linner and Paul Doyle to fine-tune the software.

The Boeing test bed computers make it possible for NASA to begin fine-tuning the launch vehicle’s software. The flight software then will be installed in the Software Integration Test Facility at Marshall and tested with other electrical hardware and software. In this facility, the SLS team can run a variety of simulations to evaluate how the vehicle will perform in space.

The final SLS flight computer that will run the flight software will have the highest processing capability available in a flight avionics computer. It is being developed by upgrading existing systems used in Global Positioning System and communication satellites.

The first test flight of the SLS is scheduled for 2017, for which the launch vehicle will be configured for a 70-metric ton lift capacity. An evolved, two-stage launch vehicle configuration will provide a lift capability of 130 metric tons to enable missions beyond Earth’s orbit and support deep space exploration.

The SLS software test bed computers were developed by Boeing and delivered to Marshall ahead of schedule. Availability of this test bed platform early in the engineering development phase allows more time for NASA programmers to develop the most capable flight software in the history of spaceflight.

Markeeva Morgan, left, and Walter Robinson integrate the software test beds into the laboratory at the Marshall Center.

Paul Doyle, right, Yvette Binford, center, and Ken King integrate and debug the SLS avionics software. After the Software Avionics team completes its work, the SLS flight software will be installed in Marshall’s Software Integration Test Facility for testing with other electrical hardware and software. In that facility, the SLS team can run a variety of mission profiles to evaluate how the vehicle performs in a real-time simulated environment.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Headlines November 26, 2014

News: When Hagel leaves, new SecDef faces big questions about the military’s futureĀ - President Obama’s new pick to run the Pentagon will face a dizzying set of challenges affecting the Defense Department’s mission, budget and culture. Who will be the next Secretary of Defense?- Following the Nov. 24 surprise announcement from the White House, the...
 
 

News Briefs November 26, 2014

Navy to decommission two more ships in Puget Sound The Navy recently decommissioned the guided missile frigate USS Ingraham at Everett, Wash. It will be towed to Bremerton and scrapped. The Daily Herald reports the Navy also plans to decommission another ship at the Everett homeport and also one stationed in Bremerton. Naval Station Everett...
 
 

NASA airborne campaigns tackle climate questions from Africa to Arctic

NASA photograph The DC-8 airborne laboratory is one of several NASA aircraft that will fly in support of five new investigations into how different aspects of the interconnected Earth system influence climate change. NASA photograph The DC-8 airborne laboratory is one of several NASA aircraft that will fly in support of five new investigations into...
 

 
Air Force photograph by Rick Goodfriend

16T Pitch Boom reactivated to support wind tunnel tests

Air Force photograph by Rick Goodfriend The Pitch Boom at the AEDC 16-foot transonic wind tunnel (16T) was recently reactivated. This model support system is used in conjunction with a roll mechanism to provide a combined pitch...
 
 

Northrop Grumman supports U.S. Air Force Minuteman missile test launch

Northrop Grumman recently supported the successful flight testing of the U.S. Air Force’s Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile weapon system. The operational flight test was conducted as part of the Air Force Global Strike Command’s Force Development Evaluation Program. This program demonstrates and supports assessment of the accuracy, availability and reliability of the...
 
 
army-detector

Scientists turn handheld JCAD into a dual-use chemical, explosives detector

Scientists at the U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., proved it is possible to teach an old dog new tricks by adding the ability to detect explosive materials to the Joint Chemical Age...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>