Business

June 14, 2012

Northrop Grumman unveils U.S. Navy’s MQ-4C BAMS Triton

by Michelle Connolly
Palmdale, Calif.

Northrop Grumman unveiled the first U.S. Navy MQ-4C Triton Broad Area Maritime Surveillance unmanned aircraft in a ceremony today at the company’s Palmdale, Calif., manufacturing facility. Keeping with the tradition of naming surveillance aircraft after Greek sea gods, the Navy named the aircraft Triton, the messenger of the sea.

The unmanned aircraft community received its first glimpse of the U.S. Navy’s MQ-4C Broad Area Maritime Surveillance unmanned aircraft system during an unveiling ceremony June 14 at Northrop Grumman’s Palmdale, Calif., manufacturing plant.

“Last year, we proudly celebrated the centennial of naval aviation – this year we have seen the rollout of a new patrol aircraft and now, the beginning of an unmanned tradition in our fleet with the rollout of BAMS,” said Vice Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mark Ferguson who spoke at the unveiling. “BAMS is uniquely suited to meet the demands of the maritime environment and give us the advantage we will need in the future – history will record this introduction as a milestone in the second hundred years of naval aviation.”

Now officially called the Triton, the MQ-4C’s unveiling caps more than four years of development with Northrop Grumman for the surveillance aircraft. The Triton will be an adjunct to the P-8A Poseidon as part of the Navy’s Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force family of systems.

“It’s a phenomenal event to see the fruits of our labor come to fruition after four years of hard work and dedication to this program,” said Capt. James Hoke, program manager for the Persistent Maritime Unmanned Aircraft Systems Program Office, which manages the Triton program. “We are looking forward to continuing testing and evaluation, parts assembly and installation and radar risk-reduction tests.”

Northrop Grumman unveiled the first U.S. Navy MQ-4C Triton Broad Area Maritime Surveillance unmanned aircraft in a ceremony today at the company’s Palmdale, Calif., manufacturing facility. Keeping with the tradition of naming surveillance aircraft after Greek sea gods, the Navy named the aircraft Triton, the messenger of the sea.

The next steps for the Triton program involve continued testing, functional requirements review and first flight for the system development and demonstration (SDD-1) aircraft. SDD-2 will follow a few months behind SDD-1.

The Triton air vehicle, which has a 130.9-foot wingspan, is based on the Air Force’s RQ-4B Global Hawk, while its sensors are based on components and systems already fielded in the Department of Defense inventory. The Triton’s new features include the AN/ZPY-3 multi-function active-sensor radar system, the primary sensor on the Triton. The MFAS completed first flight in December aboard a Gulfstream aircraft.

With the MFAS radar’s capabilities, the Triton will be able to cover more than 2.7 million square miles in a single mission. The Triton’s capability to perform persistent intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance with a range of 2,000 nautical miles will allow P-8A, P-3C and EP-3E aircraft to focus on their core missions, adding to the capability of the Navy’s Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Headlines November 24, 2014

News: Hagel said to be stepping down as defense chief under pressure - Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel is stepping down under pressure, the first cabinet-level casualty of President Obama’s Democratic majority in the Senate and a beleaguered national security team that has struggled to stay ahead of an onslaught of global crises. Afghan mission for U.S....
 
 

News Briefs November 24, 2014

Fog forces five U.S. choppers to land in Polish field Officials say that that fog forced five U.S. Army helicopters to make an emergency landing in a Polish field and spend the night there, the second such incident since September. The U.S. Army said 15 soldiers were moving equipment to their base in Germany Nov....
 
 
Air Force photograph by Samuel King Jr.

Navy’s first F-35C squadron surpasses 1,000 flight hours

Air Force photograph by Samuel King Jr. An F-35C Lightning II aircraft piloted by Lt. Cmdr. Chris Tabert, assigned to Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 101, flies the squadron’s first local sortie. The F-35C is the carrier va...
 

 
boeing-SC-787

Boeing South Carolina begins final assembly of its first 787-9 Dreamliner

Boeing has started final assembly of the 787-9 Dreamliner at its South Carolina facility. The team began joining large fuselage sections of the newest 787 Nov. 22 on schedule, a proud milestone for the South Carolina team and a...
 
 
Lockheed Martin image

Ball Aerospace equips Orion mission with key avionics, antenna hardware

Lockheed Martin image Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. is providing the phased array antennas and flight test cameras to prime contractor Lockheed Martin for Orion’s Exploration Flight Test-1 (EFT-1), which is an u...
 
 

Salina, Kansas, recalls anniversary of shuttered base

It has been 50 years this month since the announcement that Schilling Air Force Base was closing rattled Salina residents. The Salina Journal, which carried news of the closure in its Nov. 19, 1964, editions, reported that the economic disaster then spared no part of the community – real estate, retail, civic involvement, church attendance,...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>