World

June 20, 2012

News Briefs June 20, 2012

U.S. military deaths in Afghanistan at 1,883

As of June 19, 2012, at least 1,883 members of the U.S. military had died in Afghanistan as a result of the U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan in late 2001, according to an Associated Press count.

At least 1,566 military service members have died in Afghanistan as a result of hostile action, according to the military’s numbers.

Outside of Afghanistan, the department reports at least 114 more members of the U.S. military died in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Of those, 12 were the result of hostile action.

The AP count of total OEF casualties outside of Afghanistan is one more than the department’s tally.

The Defense Department also counts three military civilian deaths.

Since the start of U.S. military operations in Afghanistan, 16,368 U.S. service members have been wounded in hostile action, according to the Defense Department. AP

 

Arizona State University gets $30 million defense contract

Arizona State University has been awarded a four-year, $30 million contract from the U.S. Department of Defense to protect military personnel against bioterrorism.

The project seeks to develop a sophisticated and highly sensitive detection system to develop diagnostic immunosignaturing technology.

The technology will rapidly detect exposure to infectious disease agents before symptoms occur.

ASU officials they hope to develop a silicon chip-based technology capable of detecting a broad range of infectious organisms.

The contract is worth about $9 million for the first year and about $21 million for the final 36 months.

The co-director of the Center for Innovations in Medicine at ASU’s Biodesign Institute – Steven Albert Johnston – will lead the project. AP

 

Bulgaria cuts 2,700 jobs in its army

Bulgaria’s defense ministry says it will cut 2,700 jobs in the country’s army by the end of this month.

The ministry said in a statement June 19 that 2,400 troops and 300 civilians will be affected by the move.

By 2014, Bulgaria plans to cut its currently 44,000-strong army by 7,000 troops.

The Balkan country of 7.3 million, which joined NATO in 2004, abolished military conscription and turned its army into a fully professional force in 2008. AP

 

Airbus plans suppliers conference in Kansas

Kansas officials and Airbus Americas Chairman Allan McArtor say the state will work to encourage growth in its aviation industry through more contracts with the aircraft maker.

U.S. Sen. Jerry Moran and McArtor announced June 19 they will host an Air Capital Supplier Summit Aug. 6 at the National Center for Aviation Training in Wichita, Kansas.

More than 32,000 people work at 450 Kansas aerospace companies. That includes more than 350 people employed at Airbus’ engineering center in Wichita.

Airbus has already contracted with several Kansas companies, including Spirit AeroSystems in Wichita.

Moran and McArtor were joined by Wichita business representatives to outline efforts to further promote the partnership between Airbus and Kansas suppliers.

Suppliers interested in the summit can register at the website for the Greater Wichita Economic Development Coalition. AP




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Japan annual defense paper shows heightened worry over China

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U.S., India move forward on joint military research projects

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Saudi Arabia becomes world’s biggest defense importer

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China defense spending to grow 10.1 percent in 2015

China said March 5 it will boost defense spending by 10.1 percent, a smaller rise than last year but in line with large annual increases that have drawn concern among the country’s neighbors over Beijing’s military and territorial ambitions. Beijing says the higher spending is needed to modernize equipment and improve conditions for the 2.3...
 




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