Space

June 21, 2012

Boeing successfully completes key reviews of space launch system

Cryogenic stages validated by system requirements review, system definition review: Heavy-lift rocket program moves into design phase

Boeing last week successfully completed its first major technical reviews for the cryogenic stages of the Space Launch System, bringing the team into the design phase for the nation’s next heavy-lift, human-rated rocket.

The combined System Requirements Review and System Definition Review, held at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., with independent consultants from previous successful programs, validated that Boeing and NASA have developed solid system requirements for the cryogenic stages and supporting hardware. A cryogenic rocket engine uses liquefied gas stored at very low temperatures for optimal rocket efficiency.

While SRR is a contractual requirement, Boeing simultaneously pursued the SDR to enable a higher quality of requirements as the team enters the design phase. The reviews, completed well ahead of the scheduled August time frame for SRR, enabled a more aggressive path to core stage delivery to NASA, and validated the stage’s design concept and production approaches.

NASA’s plan uses existing elements for the boosters, crew capsule, and engines, but the cryogenic stages are new elements that require significantly more design and development. That makes successful, timely reviews essential to the progress of the entire SLS program.

“The Boeing and NASA team is demonstrating the value of our integrated approach to developing requirements,” said Jim Chilton, vice president and program manager for Boeing Exploration Launch Systems.

“SRR locks in requirements and serves as the basis for our estimates and performance metrics,” said Chuck Hanes, Boeing SLS business manager. “The understanding we reach at SRR and SDR is a firm commitment to the rocket’s requirements, design and resources.”

Boeing is designing, developing and producing part of SLS, the United States’ next-generation, human-rated rocket to transport people to deep space, enabling the next step in space exploration. Boeing is responsible for the SLS cryogenic stages and avionics. Design work for the cryogenic stages is performed in Huntsville, with production at NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Headlines July 30, 2014

News: Software to power F-35 running as much as 14 months late¬†- Software needed to operate Lockheed Martin’s F-35 jet, the Pentagon’s costliest weapons system, may be as much as 14 months late for required flight testing, according to a Pentagon review.   Business: Lockheed will turn on JLTV production line In August; 6-D truck...
 
 

News Briefs July 30, 2014

U.S. military deaths in Afghanistan at 2,197 As of July 29, 2014, at least 2,197 members of the U.S. military had died in Afghanistan as a result of the U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan in late 2001, according to an Associated Press count. At least 1,819 military service members have died in Afghanistan as a result...
 
 
Lockheed Martin photograph by Tom Reynolds

F-35B successfully completes wet runway, crosswind testing

Lockheed Martin photograph by Tom Reynolds F-35B aircraft BF-4, piloted by Lockheed Martin Test Pilot Dan Levin, starts down the runway as part of wet runway and crosswind testing at Edwards AFB, Calif. In an important program ...
 

 
boeing-chinook

Boeing delivers first U.S. Army multiyear II configured Chinook

Boeing July 29 delivered the first multiyear II configured CH-47F Chinook helicopter to the U.S. Army one month ahead of schedule. The delivery was celebrated in a ceremony at the production facility in Ridley Township, Penn. ‚...
 
 
Army photograph by SSgt. Angela Stafford

Engineers developing safer, more accurate tracer round

Army photograph Tracer rounds enable the shooter to follow the projectile trajectory to make aiming corrections. However, the light emitted by these rounds also gives away the position of the shooter. Engineers at Picatinny Ars...
 
 
NASA photograph by Carla Thomas

Katherine Lott awarded NASA Armstrong employee scholarship

NASA photograph by Carla Thomas Katherine Lott, the recipient of the 2014 NASA Armstrong Employee Exchange Council Joseph R. Vensel Memorial Scholarship, is congratulated by NASA Armstrong center director David McBride. Flankin...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>