Space

June 21, 2012

NASA offers web, mobile links to follow space station, mission control

NASA is using the Internet and smartphones to provide the public with a new inside look at what happens aboard the International Space Station and in the Mission Control Center at the Johnson Space Center in Houston. Log onto the agency’s Space Station Live! web page or download the companion ISSLive! mobile application to get up-to-the-minute information.

Groundbreaking research and technology development work is going on every day in the microgravity environment of space, and Space Station Live! allows users to see what the expedition astronauts do minute by minute. Streaming data from the space station lets the public see the latest information on temperatures, communications and power generation. Students and teachers can use the data to solve classroom problems in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or to tour the space station and mission control operator consoles through virtual 3-D view models.

Space Station Live! includes a web experience and free mobile ISSLive! app for smart phones and tablet computers accessible on NASA’s website. The app also is available through the Google Play and iTunes app stores.

Special features of the Space Station Live! web and mobile app experience include:

  • Live streaming data from various space station systems
  • Live streaming data from actual crew and science timelines with social media links
  • Descriptions and educational material that describe how the space station works
  • Educational lessons using the live content
  • 3-D virtual mission control
  • 3-D virtual space station using live streaming data to correctly position the sun, Earth, moon and the station’s solar arrays
  • 3-D model of the space station with labels and colored by the international partner contributions to its assembly
  • Links to NASA’s five international partner space agencies’ mission information.

To use Space Station Live!, visit http://spacestationlive.nasa.gov.

To download ISSLive! and other NASA mobile apps, visit http://www.nasa.gov/connect/apps.html.




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