Space

June 27, 2012

Boeing validates performance of CST vehicle’s attitude control engine

Boeing recently demonstrated the dual-role propulsion features and performance of the Orbital Maneuvering Attitude Control engine on the service module for the company’s Crew Space Transportation-100 spacecraft.

The tests were conducted at NASA’s White Sands Test Facility, N.M., as part of the second phase of NASA’s Commercial Crew Development program.

“Boeing’s unique service-module propulsion system combines on-orbit propulsion with ascent abort capability into a single system, allowing the OMAC engine and the majority of the propellant feed and pressurization hardware to perform dual roles,” said John Mulholland, vice president and program manager, Commercial Programs. “This dual-role feature reduces the number of parts and provides operational flexibility, increasing system reliability and improving crew safety.”

The OMAC engine is a heritage hypergolic propellant engine produced by Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne. The engine provides thrust for orbital maneuvers and de-orbit burns, giving the crew precise control of the spacecraft. It also performs critical attitude control and steering functions in the event of an aborted ascent. Because the engine has been modified to accommodate additional burn time for the CST-100 spacecraft, the test team conducted a series of demonstration firings on two development OMAC engines to ensure the integrity of the modification.

The tests used equipment previously used by the space shuttle program to test Orbiter Reaction Control System engines. The test firing of smaller propulsion engines in the near-vacuum environment at White Sands provides a more realistic simulation of on-orbit conditions. The OMAC test series included 20 engine firing sequences of varying numbers of pulses and durations to validate engine and valve performance as well as durability.

Boeing has successfully completed 46 CCDev milestones to date. The team is on schedule to complete remaining CCDev-2 milestones this summer, including service module propellant tank tests and a forward heat-shield jettison test that will provide additional data on important components of the spacecraft design.

Boeing’s CST-100 is a reusable spacecraft that will provide commercial crew transportation services to low Earth orbit, enabling the return of U.S. access to the International Space Station by 2016.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
nasa-astronaut

Veteran NASA astronaut, spacewalker retires from NASA

Veteran astronaut Mike Foreman has retired from NASA to join a Houston-based consulting firm. A retired captain in the U.S. Navy, Foreman’s last day with the agency is July 31. “Mike is a great American who has served our ...
 
 
NASA/JPL-Caltech photograph

NASA selects proposals to study neutron stars, black holes, more

NASA/JPL-Caltech photograph The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), launched in 2012, is an Explorer mission that allows astronomers to study the universe in high energy X-rays. NASA has selected five proposals subm...
 
 
NASA/JPL-Caltech  image

NASA’s Spitzer confirms closest rocky exoplanet

NASA/JPL-Caltech image This artist’s concept shows the silhouette of a rocky planet, dubbed HD 219134b. At 21 light-years away, the planet is the closest outside of our solar system that can be seen crossing, or transitin...
 

 

NASA awards contract to support agency’s human spaceflight programs

NASA has selected Wyle Laboratories Inc., of El Segundo, Calif., to provide biomedical, medical and health services in support of all human spaceflight programs at the agency’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. The work supports ongoing research aboard the International Space Station and helps enable the journey to Mars. The Human Health and Performance contract...
 
 
nasa-astronaut

Astronaut Stephen Frick retires from NASA

Astronaut Stephen Frick has retired from NASA to accept a position in the private sector. Frick, who flew as both a shuttle pilot and commander, left the Agency July 13. Steve has been a great asset to the astronaut office and ...
 
 
NASA/JPL-CalTech/R. Hurt photograph

NASA’s Kepler mission discovers bigger, older cousin to Earth

NASA/JPL-CalTech/R. Hurt photograph This size and scale of the Kepler-452 system compared alongside the Kepler-186 system and the solar system. Kepler-186 is a miniature solar system that would fit entirely inside the orbit of ...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>