Space

July 2, 2012

NASA Space Tech program selects technologies for development, demonstration on suborbital flights

NASA’S Space Technology Program has selected 14 technologies for development and demonstration on commercial reusable suborbital launch vehicles.

The selected proposals offer innovative cutting-edge ideas and approaches for technology in areas including active thermal management, advanced avionics, pinpoint landing and advanced in-space

propulsion.

They also address many of the high-priority technology needs identified in the recent National Research Council’s Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities report. These payloads will help NASA advance technology development needed to enable NASA’s current and future missions in exploration, science and space operations.

“These technology payloads will have the opportunity to be tested on commercial suborbital flights, sponsored by NASA, that fly up to and near the boundary of space,” said Michael Gazarik, Director of NASA’s Space Technology Program at NASA Headquarters in Washington. “The flights will ensure the technology fidelity before they’re put to work in operational systems in the harsh environment of space.”

Proposals for this solicitation were received from NASA centers and other government agencies, federally funded research and development centers, educational institutions, industry, and non-profit organizations. NASA’s Flight Opportunities Program sponsored this solicitation in collaboration with NASA’s Game Changing Development Program.

Following their development, selected technologies will be made available to the Flight Opportunities Program for pairing with appropriate suborbital reusable launch service provider flights. The Flight Opportunities Program provides opportunities for technologies to be demonstrated in relevant environments, while fostering the development of commercial reusable transportation to near space.

Awards will range from $125,000 to $500,000 with a total NASA investment of approximately $3.5 million. Payloads are expected to fly in 2013 and 2014. Proposals selected for contract negotiations are:

  • “Demonstration of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nano-tubes for Earth Climate Remote Sensing,” Howard Todd Smith, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore
  • “Facility for Microgravity Research and Submicroradian Stabilization using sRLVs,” Scott Green, Controlled Dynamics, Inc., Huntington Beach, Calif.
  • “Enhanced Thermal Switch,” Douglas Mehoke, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Md.
  • “Autonomous Flight Manager for Human-in-the-Loop Immersive Simulation and Flight Test of Terrestrial Rockets,” Kevin Duda, Draper Laboratory, Inc., Cambridge, Mass.
  • “Armadillo Launch Vehicle Attitude Knowledge Capability Enhancement Using Advanced Micro Sun Sensor,” Sohrab Mobasser, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
  • “Demonstration of Variable Radiator,” Richard Kurwitz, Texas A&M University, College Station
  • “Dynamic Microscopy System,” John Vellinger, Techshot Inc., Greenville, Ind.
  • “Design and Development of a Micro Satellite Attitude Control System,” Manoranjan Majji, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, N.Y.
  • “Suborbital Test of a Robotics-Based Method for In-Orbit Identification of Spacecraft Inertia Properties,” Ou Ma, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces
  • “Fuel Optimal Large Divert Guidance for Planetary Pinpoint Landing,” Behcet Acikmese, JPL
  • “SwRI Solar Instrument Pointing Platform,” Craig DeForest, Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, Texas
  • “Saturated Fluid Pistonless Pump Technology Demonstrator,” Ryan Starkey, University of Colorado, Boulder
  • “Electric-hydrodynamic Control of Two-Phase Heat Transfer in Microgravity,” Boris Khusid, New Jersey Institute of Technology, University Heights, N.J.
  • “An FPGA-based, Radiation Tolerant, Reconfigurable Computer System with Real Time Fault Detection, Avoidance, and Repair,” Brock LaMeres, Montana State University, Bozeman.



All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

President proclaims Memorial Day as ‘Day of Prayer’

President Barack Obama May 22 saluted the service and sacrifices of America’s military members–past and present–and proclaimed Memorial Day, May 25, 2015, “as a day of prayer for permanent peace, and I designate the hour beginning in each locality at 11 a.m. of that day as a time during which people may unite in prayer....
 
 

Air Force leaders’ Memorial Day message

Secretary of the Air Force Deborah Lee James and Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Mark A. Welsh III send the following Memorial Day message to the Airmen of the Air Force and their families: To the Airmen of the United States Air Force and their Families: On Memorial Day, Americans pause in solemn remembrance...
 
 

Headlines May 22, 2015

News: Second Marine killed in Hawaii Osprey crash identified - Marine Corps officials have identified the second Marine to die as a result of the May 17 MV-22B Osprey crash as Lance Cpl. Matthew J. Determan of Maricopa, Ariz.   Business: Israel defense exports plunge to seven-year low - Israeli defense sales last year plunged to their...
 

 

News Briefs May 22, 2015

Ukrainian officer hit with third charge in Russia A third charge has been filed against a Ukrainian military officer who has been behind bars in Moscow for nearly a year over the deaths of two Russian journalists in Ukraine. Nadezhda Savchenko, who worked as a spotter for Ukrainian troops fighting separatist rebels in eastern Ukraine,...
 
 
Army photograph by C. Todd Lopez

Smart-mortar will help Soldiers more effectively hit targets

Army photograph by C. Todd Lopez Nick Baldwin and Evan Young, researchers with the Armament Research Development and Engineering Center at Picatinny Arsenal, Pennsylvania, discuss the 120mm Guided Enhanced Fragmentation Mortar ...
 
 

Air Force assigns new chief scientist

The Air Force announced the service’s new chief scientist to serve as a science and technology adviser to the secretary of the Air Force and the chief of staff of the Air Force, May 21. Dr. Greg Zacharias will be the 35th chief scientist and is ready to “dive in” to his new role. “I...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>