Defense

July 3, 2012

Engine test facility helps to silence the roar

SSgt. Edwin Martinez-Diaz observes an F-15 Eagle fighter jet engine to ensure the machine is properly rotating during an engine test at the 18th Component Maintenance Squadron engine test facility at Kadena Air Base, Japan, June 26, 2012. The facility, which is designed to house aircraft engines requiring maintenance and testing, is also used to greatly reduce the amount of noise impact on the local community. Diaz is an aerospace propulsion journeyman with the 18th CMS.

Though the noise of fighter jets is sometimes called “the sound of freedom,” not everyone wants to hear it.

The 18th Component Maintenance Squadron at Kadena Air Base, Japan, limits the noise impact on the local community by using the engine test facility on base rather than testing the machines on the flightline.

“This facility is important because we have to test engines that have gone through tear-down at the back shop to make sure that they are operationally ready for installment into aircraft,” said TSgt. William Noble, an aerospace propulsion craftsman with the 18th CMS. “We’re able to operate here at a reduced noise level for the community.”

Operating inside the test facility enables the technicians to check for leaks and other malfunctions while repeatedly operating the engine at full power. This testing would normally create about 140 decibels of sound – without any aircraft even leaving the ground. Kadena AB’s testing facility reduces the noise level to about 40 decibels, effectively reducing the noise of a jet engine to the level of a quiet conversation. Outside the soundproof structure, the decibels from roaring engines are hardly detectable.

Making sure the engines are functionally safe and ready for flight, before installment into the aircraft, limits noise experienced around the flightline to that of actual take-offs and landings, offering the people of Kadena AB a good night’s sleep.

An F-15 Eagle fighter jet engine is pushed to maximum thrust during a routine engine test at the 18th Component Maintenance Squadron engine test facility at Kadena Air Base, Japan, June 26, 2012. The facility, which is designed to house aircraft engines requiring maintenance and testing, is also used to greatly reduce the amount of noise impact on the local community.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Kevin J. Gruenwald

40 years of Red Flag at Nellis

U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Kevin J. Gruenwald A flight of F-15 Eagles and F-16 Fighting Falcons Aggressors fly in formation over the Nevada Test and Training Ranges June 5, 2008. The proposal for Red Flag came in early...
 
 
Lockheed Martin photograph

Navy gears up to order production of 29 aircraft diagnostic systems

Lockheed Martin photograph Petty Officers Third Class Ira Schwartz assigned to Fleet Readiness Center Southeast at Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Fla., left, and Devin Riley from Fleet Readiness Center Mid-Atlantic at Naval Ai...
 
 
Courtesy photograph

96th Test Group brings ‘R2-D2′ to life

Courtesy photograph A Rear Cockpit Pallet is mounted in the back of a T-38 Talon Jan. 13, 2015 at Holloman Air Force Base, N.M. The project to build the RCP began from a need to design a platform that could serve to perform hig...
 

 

Future joint concepts focus on human elements

A panel of military officers discussed the concepts of the Strategic Landpower Task Force Jan. 16 at the Center for Strategic International Studies in Washington, D.C. Developed from the lessons learned over the past 12 years of conflict, the Joint Concept for Integrated Campaigning and the Human Aspects of Military Operations concepts are currently making...
 
 
Air Force photograph by Jet Fabara

Dutch F-35s touch down at Edwards

Air Force photograph by Jet Fabara Two F-35 Lightning IIs, F-001 and F-002, of the Royal Netherlands Air Force landed at Edwards Jan. 16, after a five-hour flight from Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. The Joint Strike Fighters arrive...
 
 
Army photograph by Conrad Johnson

Army researchers develop batteries that don’t corrode

Army photograph by Conrad Johnson Emily Wikner, an Army Research Laboratory intern (left), assists Army Research Laboratory scientist Arthur Cresce, in the Electrochemistry Branch. Cresce is the co-inventor of an electrolyte ad...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>