Defense

July 13, 2012

Navy engineers test hybrid hydraulic technologies with heavy construction equipment

by Darrell F. Waller
Port Hueneme, Calif.

Hybrid hydraulic technologies are being tested July 9-13 by Navy and Army engineers seeking to achieve greater energy efficiencies and reduce costs among the Department of Defense’s heavy construction fleet.

The Army’s Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center, is working with engineers from the Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center; the 1st Naval Construction Division; the 31st Seabee Readiness Group and its Naval Construction Battalions; and private industry.

“The testing conducted this week by Navy and Army engineers is vital to achieving the Secretary of the Navy’s energy goals and setting our Armed Forces on the path of energy independence” said Naval Facilities Engineering Command Engineering Service Center Commanding Officer, Capt. Brant D. Pickrell. “Heavy construction equipment is in use by our warfighters worldwide in virtually every theater of operations. Saving energy costs makes our fighting forces more self-sufficient, helping to free them from reliance on foreign oil sources while saving money for American taxpayers.”

The Navy is seeking to determine how emerging technologies might be used to reduce fuel consumption of expeditionary construction equipment used by Seabees during deployment. Such fuel savings will support the Secretary of the Navy’s goal for tactical energy fuel reduction by 15 percent for 2020.

Testing will include the installation of a newly developed high efficiency hydraulic system on existing heavy construction equipment and measuring the energy savings compared to an earlier test. The new system, which includes digital valves, enables the backhoe to perform the same amount of work using less hydraulic power. Power requirements will be measured and compared to readings from the Phase I baseline testing to determine overall hydraulic power reduction, fuel consumption reduction and cost savings.

In addition, two hydraulic excavators will be tested to establish fuel consumption performance. A hybrid energy recovery system that is expected to significantly reduce hydraulic losses will subsequently be installed on the excavators. The system will recover and store energy from both the boom and swing drive. Future testing will be conducted to determine improved engine efficiency, fuel consumption reduction, and predicted cost savings.

The testing is being conducted at Naval Base Ventura County, Calif., which was selected for its favorable year-round climate conditions.

The outcome of Phase II testing will determine the suitability of this concept and technology for use by the Navy’s Seabees.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
navy-china

USS Fort Worth conducts CUES with Chinese Navy

The littoral combat ship USS Fort Worth (LCS 3) practiced the Code for Unplanned Encounters at Sea (CUES) with the People’s Liberation Army-Navy Jiangkai II frigate Hengshui (FFG 572) Feb. 23 enhancing the professional ma...
 
 

AEGIS tracks, simulates engagement of three short-range ballistic missiles

The Missile Defense Agency and sailors aboard the guided-missile destroyers USS Carney (DDG 64), USS Gonzalez (DDG 66), and USS Barry (DDG 52) successfully completed a flight test involving the Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense weapon system. At approximately 2:30 a.m., EST, Feb. 26, three short-range ballistic missile targets were launched near simultaneously from NASA’s Wallops...
 
 

DOD seeks novel ideas to shape its technological future

The Defense Department is seeking novel ideas to shape its future, and officials are looking to industry, small business, academia, start-ups, the public – anyone, really – to boost its ability to prevail against adversaries whose access to technology grows daily. The program, called the Long-Range Research and Development Plan, or LRRDP, began with an...
 

 

Air Force places 18 A-10 aircraft into ‘Backup Status’

The Air Force, with congressional authorization, will convert 18 primary combat-coded A-10 Thunderbolt II aircraft from active units and place them into Backup-Aircraft Inventory status with the possibility to convert another 18 at a later date in fiscal year 2015. The secretary of Defense has authorized the Air Force to place up to a total...
 
 

AFRL shape-changing materials make form a function

Air Force Research Laboratory research is shaping the future of aerospace. Through research into soft materials called liquid crystal elastomers, AFRL scientists have developed a method to locally program the mechanical response in polymer sheets without the use of actuators and traditional mechanical parts. This research (sponsored by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research)...
 
 
Sensor Concepts Inc. photograph

Air Force Research Labís handheld imaging tool expands aircraft inspection capability

Sensor Concepts Inc. photograph An operator demonstrates the portability of the handheld imaging tool. The technology provides maintainers the ability to evaluate aircraft in the field to ensure mission-readiness. When pilots c...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>