Defense

July 13, 2012

NAWCWD performs final live-fire testing for P-8A

At 130 feet, this P-8A fuselage can’t be missed at the NAWCWD Weapons Survivability Lab. NAWCWD engineers will use the fuselage to conduct the final phase of the Live Fire Test and Evaluation Program for the P-8A Poseidon to verify the effectiveness of the aircraft’s fire suppression system.

The Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division Weapons Survivability Lab recently received a P-8A Poseidon fuselage at China Lake, Calif., that will be used to verify the effectiveness of the aircraft’s fire suppression system.

“NAWCWD is the only range for doing live fire test and evaluation of this scale,” said Paul Gorish, WSL’s live fire test and evaluation lead for the P-8 work at China Lake.

The Poseidon is the Navy’s replacement for the P-3C Orion as a long-range anti-submarine warfare, anti-surface warfare, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance aircraft capable of broad-area, maritime and littoral operations. The P-8A is based on a Boeing 737 airframe.

Gorish and his crew are currently modifying the 130-foot fuselage to make it more representative of an actual P-8A. Until now, the fuselage had been used as a static test article by Boeing in Seattle for the P-8A program.

The fuselage arrived with all the basic parts but the fire suppression systems had to be added. That build-up has taken almost four months to complete. Actual testing is expected to begin in late-summer, and continue for about eight months.

“This is the last live fire test and evaluation checkout for the P-8A,” Gorish said.

In 2005, the Navy and Boeing began performing live-fire testing on the systems that were going into P-8 during its development phase. Data from the tests were used to refine Boeing’s design of the fire suppression system. Those systems have been developed, manufactured and introduced into some of the test aircraft that are currently flying.

“Now, we are going to do a performance test of those systems,” Gorish said. “The goal of this testing is to show that we’ve eliminated the vulnerabilities that were previously identified.”

The work at China Lake includes testing the fuselage and each wing individually to verify the effectiveness of the fire suppression system. To do this, the test plan calls for shooting the wing fuel tanks and ensuring the fire suppression system puts out the fire. Another test requirement is to determine if the aircraft would remain flight worthy if the wing is damaged due to a ballistic engagement.

“The developmental phase testing was about ironing out what the system should do and how it would respond,” Gorish said. “This is a verification of the fire suppression system operating inside the aircraft with contractor-supplied hardware and software.”

After the testing is completed, Gorish will summarize the findings in a report that will be submitted to NAVAIR’s Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Aircraft Program Office for release to the Office of the Secretary of Defense.

“The work we are doing here to assess the survivability of the aircraft is extremely valuable because we check the vulnerabilities of the systems and mitigate or eliminate them,” Gorish said. “We want to make sure that when our warfighters go into harm’s way, they are going to return home safely.”




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Headlines May 1, 2015

Business: Airbus says it will file criminal complaint over U.S. spy claims - European aviation and aeronautics giant Airbus said April 30 it would file a criminal complaint against persons unknown following German media reports it had become a target of U.S. industrial espionage. Finmeccanica outlines way ahead in U.K. market - Details have emerged about how...
 
 

News Briefs May 1, 2015

U.S. commander says NATO to step up its intelligence-sharing The top U.S. commander for NATO says the alliance will begin to improve intelligence-sharing with members and cooperation about the movement of foreign fighters from Iraq and Syria to the U.S. and other Western countries. Air Force Gen. Philip Breedlove says individual nations have been sharing...
 
 
Photograph by Linda KC Reynolds

A Million Makes a Difference

Presidential Lifetime Achievement Awards were presented to Lockheed Martin employees Richard Heinstedt and Jerry Dougherty, for serving more than 4,000 hours since 2003. Sherry Imil (center) received an honorable mention for vo...
 

 
Home-for-Good-logo

Coalition comes together to house area’s homeless vets

A coalition of Antelope Valley social service and community organizations has banded together with the ambitious goal of housing the area’s homeless veteran population by December 2015. The initiative, dubbed Home for Good, h...
 
 

Airbus profit up on Dassault sale but orders down

European planemaker Airbus says it has seen its profit jump in the first quarter thanks to the sale of a stake in rival Dassault Aviation, though its plane orders and deliveries fell slightly. Airbus reported net profit of 792 million euros ($871 million) in the first quarter, compared with 439 million euros a year earlier....
 
 
Air Force photograph by SSgt. DeNoris A. Mickle

‘Sentient data’ may one day augment Soldier capability

Air Force photograph by SSgt. DeNoris A. Mickle Air Force photograph by SSgt. DeNoris A. Mickle “Sentient data,” or information that can feel and perceive things, might one day protect Soldiers and their networks, s...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>