Defense

July 17, 2012

Researchers, officials collaborate for global demining efforts

Tags:
by Amanda Rominiecki
Fort Belvoir, Va.

U.S. soldiers search for unexploded ordnance in the field of a poultry farm in Balad, Iraq. CERDEC’s Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate has conducted humanitarian demining research and development for the last 17 years as part of the Humanitarian Demining Research and Development Program.

Army researchers hosted national and foreign partners at the 2013-2014 Humanitarian Demining Requirements Workshop to plan humanitarian demining programming over the next two years, at Fort Belvoir, Va., June 18-22.

The U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s communications-electronics center, or CERDEC, brought together representatives from demining non-governmental organizations, foreign military units and mine action centers, the U.S. Departments of State and Defense and the Organization of American States for the week-long workshop.

Post-conflict landmines and unexploded ordnance, or UXO, remaining in the ground pose a serious threat to civilians as well as U.S. military forces in these areas. They also prevent the use of valuable land that is crucial for economic development.

“Post-war situations leave a wide range of hazards that can continue to be a threat to the public for decades and in some cases, centuries after the fighting has stopped,” said workshop participant, Roger Hess, of Golden West Humanitarian Foundation. “There is no set rule on how long these munitions can remain active; variables include the design, materials used and the environment.

Hess, an internationally noted explosive ordnance expert, assists Golden West’s efforts in mine and UXO clearance in Cambodia and on the island of Guadalcanal, just two of the many areas across the globe dealing with landmines and UXO.

CERDEC’s Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate, or NVESD, based here has conducted humanitarian demining research and development for the last 17 years as part of the Humanitarian Demining Research and Development, or HD R&D, Program. The program, which is run through NVESD’s Countermine Division, works to develop and demonstrate internationally shareable mine and UXO clearance technologies.

At the workshop, representatives from each organization, some traveling directly from minefields, explained their ongoing mine and UXO clearance operations, the unique challenges they face and described their most critical equipment needs.

“The information we obtained through this workshop, combined with one-on-one meetings with each organization is critical in order for us to focus our development efforts on technologies most needed in the minefields,” said Sean Burke, NVESD HD R&D Program manager.

The HD R&D Program continues to make significant contributions to the worldwide clearance of post-conflict mines and UXO. Since the HD R&D Program began in 1995, 139 evaluations of mechanical clearance and detection technologies have taken place in 36 countries. The program has helped deminers clear more than 15 million square meters of land while finding over 79,000 mines and UXO.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Headlines November 26, 2014

News: When Hagel leaves, new SecDef faces big questions about the military’s futureĀ - President Obama’s new pick to run the Pentagon will face a dizzying set of challenges affecting the Defense Department’s mission, budget and culture. Who will be the next Secretary of Defense?- Following the Nov. 24 surprise announcement from the White House, the...
 
 

News Briefs November 26, 2014

Navy to decommission two more ships in Puget Sound The Navy recently decommissioned the guided missile frigate USS Ingraham at Everett, Wash. It will be towed to Bremerton and scrapped. The Daily Herald reports the Navy also plans to decommission another ship at the Everett homeport and also one stationed in Bremerton. Naval Station Everett...
 
 

NASA airborne campaigns tackle climate questions from Africa to Arctic

NASA photograph The DC-8 airborne laboratory is one of several NASA aircraft that will fly in support of five new investigations into how different aspects of the interconnected Earth system influence climate change. NASA photograph The DC-8 airborne laboratory is one of several NASA aircraft that will fly in support of five new investigations into...
 

 
Air Force photograph by Rick Goodfriend

16T Pitch Boom reactivated to support wind tunnel tests

Air Force photograph by Rick Goodfriend The Pitch Boom at the AEDC 16-foot transonic wind tunnel (16T) was recently reactivated. This model support system is used in conjunction with a roll mechanism to provide a combined pitch...
 
 

Northrop Grumman supports U.S. Air Force Minuteman missile test launch

Northrop Grumman recently supported the successful flight testing of the U.S. Air Force’s Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile weapon system. The operational flight test was conducted as part of the Air Force Global Strike Command’s Force Development Evaluation Program. This program demonstrates and supports assessment of the accuracy, availability and reliability of the...
 
 
army-detector

Scientists turn handheld JCAD into a dual-use chemical, explosives detector

Scientists at the U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., proved it is possible to teach an old dog new tricks by adding the ability to detect explosive materials to the Joint Chemical Age...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>