Space

July 30, 2012

Report calls NASA essential for national security

Maintaining and advancing an international leadership role in space is an essential component of national security for the United States, according to a new report published by TASC, Inc.

The report details ways in which NASA can strengthen the country’s national space security posture, foster international collaboration and benefit the economy, even during times of budget austerity.

“As more nations and private entities enter the expanding space frontier, it remains crucial that we continue to play a leadership role in space,” says Bob Silsby, vice president of Business and Technology at TASC. “U.S. strength in space is essential not only for our own national security, but also for peaceful international cooperation and innovation in aerospace technology.”

With approximately 60 nations now operating in space and the expertise of other space agencies on the rise, U.S. space technological superiority is rapidly being challenged. Maintaining U.S. leadership in space is complicated by the fact that NASA, the Department of Defense, the intelligence community and the private-sector aerospace industry all face stagnant or declining budgets for the foreseeable future. Furthermore, as the luster of the space shuttle and moon missions fades, many Americans wonder whether space exploration remains essential to our nation’s future.

In fact, “NASA’s ability to advance aerospace technologies impacts everything from the security of our existing space infrastructure to the development of items most Americans use every day, such as GPS-enabled cell phones,” says Darin Skelly, TASC account manager for the civil space market.

The report, “NASA Is Essential for National Security,” highlights NASA’s unique ability to promote peaceful international cooperation in space; support the domestic aerospace industry and burgeoning commercial space industry; and develop cost-cutting technologies that will be beneficial to the government and throughout the economy. Silsby, Skelly and TASC engineer Gary Oleson co-authored the report.

To read the full report, go to http://www.tasc.com/media-center/white-papers/.

Founded in 1966, TASC, Inc., helps solve complex national security and public safety challenges by providing advanced systems engineering, integration and decision-support services to the Intelligence Community, Department of Defense and civilian agencies of the federal government. With about 5,000 employees in 40 locations, TASC generates more than $1.5 billion in annual revenue.




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