Space

August 6, 2012

Ball Aerospace demonstrates prototype X-band SATCOM on-the-move phased array antenna

Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. has successfully demonstrated its Mobile Multifunction Low-Cost Array system, a prototype X-band SATCOM On-the-Move phased array antenna, at the U.S. Army’s Aberdeen Proving Ground facility, Aberdeen, Md.

The MMLCA system was developed for the Office of Naval Research to demonstrate high data rate communications with military and commercial satellite systems. The system was developed under ONR’s FORCEnet Future Naval Capabilities program.

MMLCA is a self-contained low profile antenna system with no rotating parts for use by a variety of military combat vehicles and platforms. The system enables current and future military platforms to reduce the number of necessary antennas, provide better antenna coverage, and lower the overall silhouette of vehicles. Refinements identified during testing will be incorporated prior to fielding the system in an operational theater.

“MMLCA is significantly more rugged than competing conventional designs making it more impervious to weather and battlefield operations,” said Jim Oschmann, Ball Aerospace vice president and general manager for Tactical Solutions. “Additionally, it incorporates the advantages found in advanced phased array antennas including a lower profile design for hemispherical coverage, high-reliability, and lower total ownership cost.”

Ball Aerospace designs and develops low observable, conformal and phased array antenna technology for various military platforms including aircraft, missiles, land vehicles, ships, small craft and space applications.




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