Events

August 9, 2012

Chief of naval research moderates panel at unmanned systems conference

Tags:
by Grace Jean
Office of Naval Research

LAS VEGAS, Nev. (Aug. 8, 2012) Rear Adm. Matthew Klunder, chief of naval research, leads an unmanned maritime systems panel during the annual conference for the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI). the Office of Naval Research participation in AUVSI Unmanned Systems North America 2012, held in Las Vegas, included exhibits and presentations highlighting research efforts in autonomy for robotic watercraft and ground robots, onboard planning systems for unmanned aircraft and multiple autonomous systems.

The Navy’s chief of naval research led a panel discussion highlighting technology challenges and a vision for future maritime robotic systems Aug. 8, at the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International’s annual conference.

Rear Adm. Matthew Klunder, the Office of Naval Research’s 24th chief, spoke about the Navy’s increasing reliance on maritime robotic systems to conduct a wide variety of missions, from oceanographic research to helping sailors track down potential threats in waters around the globe.

“Our vision is to ensure successful integration between unmanned systems and the warfighter,” Klunder said. “I believe this approach of developing a hybrid naval force of manned and unmanned systems is part of our innovative future.”

He moderated a panel of experts who represent organizations that employ unmanned maritime systems. Topics included technology shortfalls, program efforts and current operations.

Panelists included the Navy’s program manager of unmanned maritime systems, Capt. Duane Ashton; the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration’s deputy assistant administrator for oceanic and atmospheric research, retired Navy Capt. Craig McLean; Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute’s chief technologist, Dr. James Bellingham; and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution’s senior scientist in applied ocean physics and engineering, Dr. Dana Yoerger.

ONR’s participation in AUVSI’s Unmanned Systems North America 2012, held in Las Vegas, Nev., included exhibits and presentations highlighting research efforts in autonomy for robotic watercraft and ground robots, onboard planning systems for unmanned aircraft and control technologies for multiple autonomous systems.

ONR provides the science and technology necessary to maintain the Navy and Marine Corps’ technological advantage. Through its affiliates, ONR is a leader in science and technology with engagement in 50 states, 70 countries, 1,035 institutions of higher learning and 914 industry partners. ONR employs approximately 1,400 people, comprising uniformed, civilian and contract personnel, with additional employees at the Naval Research Lab in Washington, D.C.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Headlines April 18, 2014

Business: Lockheed to Lose 17 F-35s Under Automatic Pentagon Cuts - Pentagon will cut 17 of the 343 F-35 fighters it planned to buy from Lockheed Martin in fiscal 2016 through 2019 unless Congress repeals automatic budget cuts, according to a new Defense Department report. DOD looking for ways not to break MH-60R helo deal - The...
 
 

News Briefs April 18, 2013

U.S. military deaths in Afghanistan at 2,177 As of April 15, 2014, at least 2,177 members of the U.S. military had died in Afghanistan as a result of the U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan in late 2001, according to an Associated Press count. At least 1,802 military service members have died in Afghanistan as a result...
 
 
LM-F35-hours

F-35 fleet surpasses 15,000 flying hours

The Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II fleet recently surpassed 15,000 flight hours, marking a major milestone for the program.  “Flying 15,000 hours itself demonstrates that the program is maturing, but what I think is e...
 

 
nasa-cassini

NASA Cassini images may reveal birth of new Saturn moon

NASA’s Cassini spacecraft has documented the formation of a small icy object within the rings of Saturn that may be a new moon, and may also provide clues to the formation of the planet’s known moons. Images taken w...
 
 

NASA completes LADEE mission with planned impact on Moon’s surface

Ground controllers at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif., have confirmed that NASA’s Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer spacecraft impacted the surface of the moon, as planned, between 9:30 and 10:22 p.m., PDT, April 17. LADEE lacked fuel to maintain a long-term lunar orbit or continue science operations and was intentionally sent...
 
 
Photograph courtesy of NASA Ames/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech

NASA’s Kepler telescope discovers first Earth-size planet in ‘habitable zone’

Photograph courtesy of NASA Ames/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech Kepler-186f resides in the Kepler-186 system about 500 light-years from Earth in the constellation Cygnus. The system is also home to four inner planets, seen lined up...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>