Defense

August 20, 2012

‘Vanguard’ Soldiers field precision-guided mortar munitions

Tags:
by SSgt. Tanya Polk
Fort Stewart, Ga.

An MV-22 Osprey prepares to fly Japan Defense Minister Satoshi Morimoto to Marine Corps Base Quantico following a joint press conference with Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta at the Pentagon Aug. 3, 2012.

On today’s battlefield, the enemy often plans attacks in highly populated areas, hoping that U.S. service members won’t retaliate and risk accidental injuries to innocent people.

Soldiers with the 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, Third Infantry Division, now have a more accurate method of firing indirect mortar rounds into congested areas, if necessary, after fielding the Accelerated Precision Mortar Initiative cartridge over the past three weeks at Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Accelerated Precision Mortar Initiative, or APMI, is a GPS-guided round fired from the M120 mortar system, which is part of the M326 Mortar Stowage Kit.

“It allows commanders to fire 120 mm mortar rounds into congested areas with less collateral damage,” said SFC Jay Martin, mortar platoon sergeant with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3rd Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 4IBCT, 3rd ID. “It’s pretty accurate, with the capability of landing one-to-six meters away from the grid the soldiers established.”

About 60 indirect fire infantrymen with the 3rd Bn., 7th Inf. Regt., 3rd Bn., 15th Inf. Regt., and 6th Squadron, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 4IBCT, tested the technologically advanced rounds, Aug. 8, after learning how to use the precision round in a three-week course.

“They hit the target with one round,” SSgt. Justin Meiers said about his Troops who tested the new mortar’s capability.

Meiers added that these munitions not only help lower the amount of collateral damage, but keeps his fellow infantry soldiers safer who don’t have to enter the congested areas using direct fire.

 




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Headlines July 29, 2015

News: Lockheed F-35s reliability found wanting in shipboard testing¬†– The Marine Corps’ version of Lockheed Martin’s F-35 fighter demonstrated poor reliability in a 12-day exercise at sea, according to the U.S. military’s top testing officer.   Business: Rockwell Collins to upgrade Boeing comms system¬†– Rockwell Collins will upgrade the low-frequency transmi...
 
 

News Briefs July 29, 2015

U.S. Navy examines health concerns near Guantanamo court A complaint lodged with the Pentagon has prompted the U.S. Navy to look into the possible presence of anything that may cause cancer in a section of the base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, a military spokeswoman said July 28. The Navy Marine Corps Public Health Center and...
 
 
Air Force photograph by SrA. Betty R. Chevalier

New interrogation system installed on AWACS, more in pipeline

Air Force photograph by SrA. Betty R. Chevalier An E-3 Sentry AWACS from Tinker Air Force Base, Okla., prepares to land May 16, 2015. AWACS have the capability to detect enemy as well as friendly aircraft at great distances usi...
 

 

Remains of Pearl Harbor victims raised for identification

The military July 27 exhumed more caskets containing the unidentified remains of USS Oklahoma crew members killed in the 1941 bombing of Pearl Harbor. The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency disinterred five coffins from four grave sites at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, where they have rested for decades. The work is...
 
 
Boeing photograph

Boeing Oklahoma City expansion grows facilities, business presence

Boeing photograph July 29, Boeing broke ground on a new laboratory facility in Oklahoma City. Mayor Mick Cornett, Commissioner Brian Maughan, President of Boeing Global Services and Support Leanne Caret, Oklahoma Governor Mary ...
 
 

NASA awards contract to support agency’s human spaceflight programs

NASA has selected Wyle Laboratories Inc., of El Segundo, Calif., to provide biomedical, medical and health services in support of all human spaceflight programs at the agency’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. The work supports ongoing research aboard the International Space Station and helps enable the journey to Mars. The Human Health and Performance contract...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>