Business

September 4, 2012

Boeing Winged Joint Direct Attack Munition completes first round of tests

A winged version of the Boeing Joint Direct Attack Munition that will triple the weapon’s glide range to more than 40 miles is a step closer to production after completing wind tunnel tests at a U.S. facility in June.

Developed in partnership with the Commonwealth of Australia, the 500-pound JDAM Extended Range features a modular add-on wing kit that will unfold in flight. The kit can also be coupled with other modular enhancements, such as laser sensors. The wings were first integrated with the Boeing JDAM during the Commonwealth’s Capability and Technology Demonstration program, which successfully completed flight tests in 2008.

Boeing will produce and integrate the JDAM-ER wing kits for the Royal Australian Air Force under a contract awarded in 2011. The kits will be built in Australia, with initial deliveries expected to begin in early 2015.

“Boeing and our Australian partners have worked closely together to employ affordable technology and the leanest manufacturing processes to cost-effectively enhance JDAM’s capabilities,” said Debbie Rub, Boeing vice president and general manager for Missiles and Unmanned Airborne Systems. “The JDAM-ER effectively meets the needs of the Commonwealth by providing a greater stand-off capability and making it safer for pilots to prosecute their missions on today’s ever-changing battlefields.”

“By successfully transitioning this technology from prototype to production, the Australian Defence Force will be able to further reduce the risk to its personnel on operations, allowing RAAF aircrew to engage their targets from beyond the range of enemy air defences,” said Jason Clare, Australia’s Minister for Defence Materiel. “These enhancements will increase the ability of the RAAF to strike more targets in fewer sorties.”

JDAM is a low-cost guidance kit that converts existing unguided bombs into near- precision weapons. Boeing intentionally designed its JDAM kit to be modular so the product could mature with a variety of technological upgrades such as a laser sensor, improved immunity to GPS jamming, and an all-weather radar sensor.

Boeing has built more than 238,000 JDAM tail kits in its St. Charles, Mo., facility since production started in 1998. JDAM is used by 26 international militaries.

 




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
GPS-OCX

GPS III, OCX successfully demonstrate key satellite command, control capabilities

Lockheed Martin and Raytheon successfully completed the fourth of five planned launch and early orbit exercises to demonstrate new automation capabilities, information assurance and launch readiness of the worldís most powerfu...
 
 

Aerojet Rocketdyne successfully demonstrates 3D printed rocket propulsion system for satellites

Aerojet Rocketdyne has successfully completed a hot-fire test of its MPS-120 CubeSat High-Impulse Adaptable Modular Propulsion System. The MPS-120 is the first 3D-printed hydrazine integrated propulsion system and is designed to provide propulsion for CubeSats, enabling missions not previously available to these tiny satellites. The project was funded out of the NASA Office of Chief...
 
 

Boeing breaks ground in St. Louis for new composites center

Boeing Dec. 16 began construction in St. Louis of a new 367,000-square-foot facility in which it will build parts for the newest member of its 777 commercial airplanes family, the 777X.  About 700 new jobs will be created for the 777X work. Construction should be complete in 2016, with work on 777X wing and empennage...
 

 

Raytheon, Bell conduct first missile launch from V-22

Raytheon and Bell Helicopter have completed two successful launches of the Griffin B missile from a Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey multi-mission aircraft at Yuma Proving Ground, Ariz. As an industry funded effort with Bell’s Xworx, Raytheon demonstrated the simplicity of integrating the Griffin B missile onto the V-22 platform. “This is the first time a...
 
 

Raytheon gallium nitride technology validated for space applications

Satellites may soon carry Raytheon’s Gallium Nitride technology into Earth orbit. Raytheon has successfully validated its GaN Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit technology for use in space-bound equipment. Raytheon GaN MMICs, fabricated at its Andover, Massachusetts foundry, demonstrated the radiation hardness required for space through Single Event Burn-out and Total Ionizing Dose t...
 
 
Air Force photograph by A1C Alexander Guerrero

317th AG delivers during massive JFE

Air Force photograph by A1C Alexander Guerrero Eleven C-130H Herculesí from various Air National Guard units and thirteen C-130J Super Herculesí from the 317th Airlift Group at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, prepare to take off...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>