Local

September 6, 2012

NASA Aeronautic Academy interns finish program

NASA Dryden 2012 Aeronautics Academy summer interns show off the large model of the Prandtl-D high-aspect-ratio flying wing. The interns recently completed a ten week internship at Dryden and also visited NASA headquarters in Washington, D.C., Goddard in Maryland, and Ames in San Jose, Calif. Interns left to right: Javier Gonzalez-Rocha, Luis Andrade, Stephanie Reynolds, Steffi Valkov, Kimberly Callan, Julianna Plumb, Joseph Wagster, Nancy PiÒon, Ronalynn Ramos and Sanel Horozovic.

Inertia, proverse yaw, bifilar sensitivity, aileron deflection, doublet maneuvers – throw in a few mathematical equations that have more letters than numbers and it’s enough to make anyone’s head spin.

However, that is what 10 NASA interns from the NASA Aeronautic Academy at Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., worked on during their 10-week internship program.

“It is really hard for me to verbalize the whole NASA intern experience,” said Kimberly Callan, 20, from Sheboygan, Wisc., who is studying aeronautical and mechanical engineering at University of Wisconsin-Madison. “Totally awesome is the best I can come up with.”

Around the age of two, Callan recalls receiving a little airplane whose nose lit up when it was pushed. It was her favorite Christmas present and it ignited her desire to fly. By the age of six she wanted to work for NASA and by 18 she had her private pilots license.

Under the mentorship of Albion Bowers, associate director for Research; Dr. Oscar Murillo and Brian Taylor, interns worked with a glider model (PRANDTL-D) that is built of composite wrapped foam core. The 12.3-foot model weighs approximately 14 pounds, looks like a flying wing and was used to “determine the mass properties in order to create a dynamic model and calculate the stability and control derivatives both from simulation and flight, to demonstrate proverse yaw.”

As it is with flight test, some days did not go as hoped.

“We couldn’t get in a long flight to get all the data we needed but as Oscar said, even a crash isn’t a failure because you are still learning. Boy, did we learn a lot!” explained Stephanie Reynolds who is from Rosamond, Calif., and studying mechanical engineering at Cal State University Long Beach.

Students learned more than engineering from their mentor’s enthusiasm and attitude. “They made us figure things out for ourselves and treated us like real engineers. From their actions we learned how to stay positive, keep testing and not to give up.”

“I came here 30 years ago on a student program because someone believed in me and took a chance on me. Our director, David McBride, also came here because of a student program,” said Bowers. “These students are our future and in a like manner, this little aircraft points to a brighter future, with a higher efficiency possible than anything flying today.”

The UAV Prandtl-D project has the promise of 40-60 percent efficiency improvement in aircraft performance, and about 13 percent improvement in turbine systems.

The interns presented their project at NASA headquarters in Washington, D.C., and also visited NASA Goddard in Maryland and Ames in San Jose, Calif. Callan met both of her senators and her congressman in Washington.

After visiting Scaled Composites in Mojave and other smaller aerospace companies, intern Joseph Wagster IV, 22, changed his direction.

Being a bit of an overachiever and very family oriented, Wagster realized that if he worked for a small company, he would become consumed and live at his job.

“At NASA you work as a team and you do your part, but at the end of the day, you go home,” said Wagster. He is studying aerospace engineering at Cal State Polytechnic University, Pomona, and is thinking about getting his Ph. D and teaching engineering.

Steffi Valkov, 24, of San Gabriel, Calif., used to watch the planes take off at Los Angeles Airport with her father.

“We would sit and watch for hours. I was so amazed that something heavier than air could fly,” she said. “I was about seven and tried to wrap my head around that.”

Valkov’s father had her help him change tires, batteries and general up keep of his car. They also played Super Nintendo that made her interested in hardware and software. From third grade through high school she was a GATE student and recently graduated from aerospace engineering at Cal State Polytechnic University, Pomona.

“This internship has been an incredible experience and I definitely feel that I applied my aerospace knowledge to the Prandtl-D project,” said Valkov. Her dream job would be working full time at NASA. “I love visiting the AV (Antelope Valley) because of all the aircraft flying. I can’t get enough of them.”

Some of the students also met up with other interns from different programs and countries to experience skydiving, rock climbing, pool parties, concerts etc., and made life-long friends.

“Unfortunately, there is a downside of being at Dryden,” said Callan.” Unless I work for NASA someday, I don’t anything will ever top this amazing experience.”

 




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Headlines July 25, 2014

News: VA reform bills stalled by partisan bickering - Plans for a comprehensive Veterans Affairs Department reform bill that appeared all but finished a month ago devolved into partisan bickering and funding fights July 24, casting doubt on the future of a deal.   Business: Airbus, Boeing, Lockheed announce bids on Danish fighter competition; Saab withdraws -...
 
 

News Briefs July 25, 2014

Marines investigate corporal who vanished in Iraq U.S. Marine Corp officers are launching a formal investigation into whether a Lebanese-American Marine deserted his unit in Iraq or later after returning to the United States. A spokesman for the 2nd Marine Expeditionary Force at Camp Lejeune said July 24 that Cpl. Wassef Ali Hassoun is being...
 
 
Air Force photograph by A1C Erin OíShea

U.S. Forces display military might at Farnborough

Air Force photograph by A1C Erin O’Shea Capt. Tom Meyers discusses the F-15E Strike Eagle’s capabilities with spectators July 17, 2014, at the Farnborough International Airshow in England. Public access was granted ...
 

 
raptors4

Raptors, Falcons fuel up in desert skies

Three U.S. Air Force F-22 Raptors assigned to the 325th Fighter Wing, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla., fly alongside a KC-135 Stratotanker assigned to the 93rd Air Refueling Squadron, Fairchild AFB, Wash., during Red Flag 14-3, Ju...
 
 
lm-kmax

Lockheed Martin’s unmanned cargo helicopter team returns from deployment

After lifting more than 4.5 million pounds of cargo and conducting thousands of delivery missions for the U.S. Marine Corps, the Lockheed Martin and Kaman Aerospace Corporation K-MAX cargo unmanned aircraft system has returned ...
 
 
Air Force photograph by A1C Thomas Spangler

Sun sets on Red Flag 14-3

Air Force photograph by A1C Thomas Spangler The sun sets behind a row of F-16 Fighting Falcons during Red Flag 14-3, July 16, 2014, at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. Red Flag provides a series of intense air-to-air combat scenario...
 




3 Comments


  1. When you get a little depressed hearing about America’s future and you think our youth is a lost cause, chat with a NASA/ Aerospace intern . You won’t hear about their goals, dreams and accomplishments in the mainstream media, but yes, they do exist. Support your local aerospace papers and programs/schools!


  2. John A. Fergione

    This is what mentoring is all about. STEM education is great, but being able to apply the academic principles learned with related hands-on experience makes the entire process significantly more valuable. NASA deserves high commendation grades for allowing these students to do just that.
    John A. Fergione
    Experimental Test Pilot {Retired}


  3. Geoff Steele

    As many Fed R&D programs face cutbacks due to budgeting challenges, the question becomes how we can maintain needed momentum. Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) between government agencies and private aerospace manufacturers, contractors, universities, and other organizations can provide this needed leverage. This is an excellent story portraying this concept — GOOD for you all in carrying this coverage! It’s also a comfort to see that our tax dollars appropriated for these types of R&D efforts can be magnified by such cooperative agreements. The other win-win is motivating and equipping the next generation of problem-solvers by giving them hands-on experience in addressing real-life challenges. GOOD SHOW !!



Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>