Defense

September 18, 2012

Dempsey, Turks discuss regional issues

Tags:
Jim Garamone
American Forces Press Service
DOD photograph by D. Myles Cullen
U.S. Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, left, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, meets with Turkish Army Gen. Necdet Ozel, right, chief of general staff, at the Ministry of Defense in Ankara, Turkey, Sept. 17, 2012.

The paving stones on the Road of Lions leading to Mustafa Kemal Ataturk’s mausoleum are purposely placed about three inches apart so those who approach it have to think about where they are.

Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey walked the Road of Lions to place a memorial wreath at the tomb of the man who founded the Turkish Republic Sept. 17. The chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff was in Ankara, Turkey, to consult with Turkish military and civilian leaders.

“I am deeply honored and proud as a representative of the American people to pay my respects to the Turkish nation and to this great leader,” Dempsey wrote in the tribute book in the Anitkabir, which is what the Turks call the memorial and museum in downtown Ankara.

Ataturk died in 1938, but his spirit continues to guide the nation. In each Turkish office the chairman visited today, photos or paintings of Ataturk – which means Father of the Turks – graced the walls.

Turkey is a key U.S. bilateral and NATO ally, Dempsey said. He visited Turkish leaders to get their sense of the issues in the region, and to find ways to increase cooperation between the United States and Turkey.

The chairman started the day at the American Embassy. He met with U.S. Ambassador to Turkey Francis J. Ricciardone and the American country team. He moved from there to the Office of Defense Cooperation, where he spoke with Air Force Brig. Gen. James E. Daniel Jr. and his staff about military-to-military issues, foreign military sales and the international military education and training program.

Turkey is part of the joint strike fighter program, and has indicated it ultimately will buy 100 F-35A’s. Turkey’s other big purchase from the United States is Patriot anti-missile batteries.

The chairman then moved to Ataturk ceremony, and then on to the Ministry of National Defense, where met with his counterpart, Gen. Necdet Ozel of the Turkish army, chief of the General Staff. Then Dempsey and his staff received a briefing on regional issues, including Syria.

“It started with a briefing and evolved into a discussion,” said Marine Corps Col. Dave Lapan, special assistant to the chairman for public affairs. “The discussion on Syria started with refugees, moved to proliferation and then to missile defense. The Turks see the war in Syria very much as we do.”

The Turks gave a masterful presentation on regional issues, Lapan said, starting with the Arab Spring, moving to Syria, Iraq and other threats such as the PKK.

The PKK – a Kurdish terror group operating in eastern Turkey – was a big part of the discussion, Lapan said, noting that the United States shares intelligence with Turkey about the terrorist threat.

Dempsey then moved to the other side of the Turkish version of the Pentagon and met with Minister of National Defense Ismet Yilmaz before visiting the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to meet with Deputy Foreign Minister Naci Koru.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Headlines August 1, 2014

News: Military downsizing leaves U.S. too weak to counter global threats, panel finds - An independent panel appointed by the Pentagon and Congress said July 31 that President Obama’s strategy for sizing the armed services is too weak for today’s global threats. Defense industry funds flow to contenders for key House chairmanships - Four of the top...
 
 

News Briefs August 1, 2014

China allows foreign reporters at news conference Foreign reporters are being allowed to attend China’s Defense Ministry briefings for the first time, marking a small milestone in the increasingly confident Chinese military’s efforts to project a more transparent image. Restrictions still apply and there is no sign of an improvement in the generally paltry amount...
 
 
Army photograph by John Andrew Hamilton

Rapid Equipping Force, PEO Soldier test targeting device at White Sands Missile Range

Army photograph by John Andrew Hamilton SFC Justin Rotti, a combat developer from the Training and Doctrine Command Fire Cell, Fires Center of Excellence, uses a developmental hand held precision targeting device during a test ...
 

 

NASA awards modification for geophysics, geodynamics, space geodesy support contract

NASA has awarded a modification to Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies Inc. of Greenbelt, Md. to continuing working the the Geophysics, Geodynamics and Space Geodesy Support Services contract. The maximum ordering value of the GGSG contract will increase to $76.8 million. The previous amount was $49.5 million. The increase in the maximum ordering value of the contract...
 
 
boeing-japan

Boeing, All Nippon Airways finalize order for 40 wide-body airplanes

  Boeing and All Nippon Airways July 31 finalized an order for 40 widebody airplanes – 20 777-9Xs, 14 787-9 Dreamliners and six 777-300ERs (Extended Range) – as part of the airline’s strategic long-haul fleet ren...
 
 

Excalibur Ib enters full rate production, receives $52 million award

TUCSON, Ariz., July 31, 2014 /PRNewswire/ — Raytheon’s Excalibur Ib precision guided projectile has entered full rate production. U.S. Army approval of FRP completes Excalibur Ib’s low rate initial production phase. †Additionally, the U.S. Army has awarded Raytheon $52 million for continued Excalibur Ib production. “The full rate production decision is the culmination ...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>