Space

September 21, 2012

NASA selects teachers to fly student experiments in reduced gravity aircraft

Teachers from six NASA Explorer Schools have been selected to receive the 2012 School Recognition Award for their contributions to science, technology, engineering and mathematics education.

The teachers selected are from Woodrow Wilson Middle School, Glendale, Calif.; Franke Park Elementary School, Fort Wayne, Ind.; Mountview Road School, Morris Plains, N.J.; Corpus Christi Catholic School, Chambersburg, Pa.; Fairport High School, Fairport N.Y.; and Forest Lake Elementary Technology Magnet School, Columbia, S.C.

In April 2013, three teachers from each school will travel to NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. There they will have the opportunity to fly aboard the agency’s reduced gravity aircraft and conduct experiments designed by their students. The experiments will examine the acceleration and inertia of objects, how fluids with different viscosities behave in microgravity, and how the absence of gravity affects mass and weight.

“Congratulations to the NES teachers selected for this innovative NASA experience. The reduced gravity flights allow teachers to conduct scientific investigations in a microgravity environment, similar to how experiments are conducted on the International Space Station,” said Cecelia Fletcher, acting program manager for primary and secondary education at NASA Headquarters in Washington. “This experiential learning opportunity helps to spread the excitement of STEM education with teachers and students throughout the NASA Explorer School network.”

A team of NASA personnel reviewed many applications before selecting these six schools for their exemplary classroom practices and innovative uses of NES resources to engage a broad school population. These schools were chosen from more than 470 schools that are registered participants in the NASA Explorer Schools project.

The NASA Explorer Schools project is the classroom-based gateway for students in grades 4-12 that focuses on stimulating STEM education using agency content and themes.

 




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