Space

September 28, 2012

NASA announces senior leadership changes

NASA Administrator Charles Bolden announced three changes to his senior leadership team Sept. 25.

Robert Lightfoot, acting associate administrator at NASA Headquarters in Washington, will assume that role on a permanent basis. Patrick Scheuermann, director of NASA’s John C. Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss., will become director of NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. Scheuermann, will replace Robin Henderson, who has filled the position on a temporary basis since Gene Goldman’s retirement Aug. 3. Lightfoot began his assignment as acting associate administrator March 5.

Scheuermann’s successor as the Stennis director is Dr. Richard J. Gilbrech, who currently serves as that center’s deputy director. All three management changes are effective immediately.

“Robert, Patrick and Rick are three of NASA’s finest public servants who will continue to play key roles in our agency’s future,” NASA Administrator Charles Bolden said. “America is fortunate to have three such talented leaders assuming these important jobs at a pivotal time for NASA and space exploration.”

As associate administrator, Lightfoot is the agency’s highest-ranking civil servant, responsible for oversight and integration of NASA’s broad efforts in human space flight, science and aeronautics. Lightfoot began his NASA career as a test engineer and manager for the space shuttle main engine technology test bed program. He then served in leadership positions at Marshall, Stennis and Headquarters. From 2003 to 2005, he was assistant associate administrator for the Space Shuttle Program, Office of Space Flight, at Headquarters.

Scheuermann has provided executive leadership, overall direction and management of Stennis since being named that center’s director in 2010. He is responsible for implementing NASA’s mission in the area of rocket propulsion testing, and developing and maintaining NASA’s world-class rocket propulsion test facilities.

Scheuermann previously served as Stennis’ deputy director and associate director, in addition to working as chief operating officer of NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans. Since joining NASA in 1988 as a propulsion test engineer, he worked on numerous major test projects at Stennis, including serving as project manager for NASA’s Reusable Launch Vehicle program, a NASA-industry effort to develop a new generation of safe and cost-effective rockets to send payloads to space.

Gilbrech has served as Stennis’ deputy director since 2010. He began his NASA career in 1991 at Stennis in the area of propulsion test technology. From 1998 to 2000, he served as chief of the Propulsion Test Engineering Division at Stennis, and in 2003, he was named manager of the Propulsion Integration Office, responsible for managing NASA’s rocket propulsion test facilities.

Later in 2003, Gilbrech relocated to Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va., to become a principal engineer in the NASA Engineering and Safety Center. He later served as deputy of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center and as deputy director of Langley. In 2006, Gilbrech was named director of Stennis, serving in that role until assuming leadership of NASA’s Exploration Systems Mission Directorate at Headquarters in Washington.

All three men are highly honored NASA leaders, earning the Presidential Rank Award of Meritorious Executive and agency medals for outstanding leadership.

 




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
NASA image

Ozone-depleting compound persists, NASA research shows

NASA image Satellites observed the largest ozone hole over Antarctica in 2006. Purple and blue represent areas of low ozone concentrations in the atmosphere; yellow and red are areas of higher concentrations. NASA research show...
 
 

NASA’s RXTE satellite decodes rhythm of an unusual black hole

https://www.youtube.com/embed/TSWZI2oUgnI?enablejsapi=1&rel=0 Astronomers have uncovered rhythmic pulsations from a rare type of black hole 12 million light-years away by sifting through archival data from NASA’s Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer satellite. The signals have helped astronomers identify an unusual midsize black hole called M82 X-1, which is the brightest X-ray source in a ga...
 
 

NASA announces awards to expand informal STEM education network

NASA has selected 12 informal educational institutions to receive approximately $6 million in agency funding to provide compelling science, technology, engineering and math opportunities in informal education settings, such as museums, science centers, planetariums and NASA visitor centers. The selected projects will complement and enhance STEM curricula taught in traditional kindergarten throu...
 

 

Orbital completes third cargo delivery mission to ISS

Orbital Sciences Corporation, one of the world’s leading space technology companies, announced Aug. 18 the successful completion of its third cargo delivery mission to the International Space Station in the past 10 months, including the initial demonstration flight completed in October 2013 and the first two operational missions under the company’s $1.9 billion Commercial Resupply...
 
 

NASA selects Texas State University to provide educator professional development

NASA’s Minority University Research and Education Project has awarded approximately $15 million in a new, five-year cooperative agreement to Texas State University at San Marcos to provide educator professional development using NASA-related science, technology, engineering and math content. The selection is in response to an Education Opportunities in NASA STEM ñ Educator Professional D...
 
 
Photograph courtesy of NASA/SAO/CXC/R. Margutti et al

NASA’s Chandra Observatory searches for trigger of nearby supernova

Photograph courtesy of NASA/SAO/CXC/R. Margutti et al NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory is helping determine what caused SN 2014J, one of the closest supernovas discovered in decades. By comparing X-ray data taken before and a...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>