Events

October 9, 2012

Engineering, Science Hall of Fame accepting nominations

The Engineering and Science Hall of Fame, an international non-profit organization honoring persons who have made outstanding contributions to engineering and science which have improved the quality of life for humankind, is currently accepting nominations for an exceptional individual or individuals whose career accomplishments satisfy the mission of the ESHoF.

For full consideration by the selection committee, nominations for induction into the ESHoF are due by Feb. 28, 2013.

Nomination forms are available on the ESHoF website at www.eshalloffame.org/nominations. The forms can be submitted electronically or mailed to:

Engineering and Science Hall of Fame

c/o The Engineers Club of Dayton

110 East Monument Avenue

Dayton, Ohio 45402

If you have specific questions about the nomination process, contact David Banaszak, Chairman, Nomination Committee at 937-849-9140 or davebanaszak@juno.com.

Currently, there are more than 50 world renowned enshrines including Wilbur and Orville Wright, Thomas Edison, Enrico Fermi, George Washington Carver, Buckminster Fuller, Jonas Salk and Nikola Tesla. The newly elected inductees to the ESHoF will be enshrined on Thursday, Nov. 14, 2013 at the Engineers Club of Dayton. The morning after the dinner, the inductees or their representatives will be invited to speak to and interact with high school students and teachers at the Engineers Club of Dayton.

The Engineering and Science Hall of Fame is an international non-profit, 501(c)3 organization honoring people who have made outstanding contributions to engineering and science which have, in turn, produced major improvements to the quality of life. Its educational objective is to motivate and inspire young people to understand, appreciate and pursue careers in engineering and science. A description of the ESHoF including a list of all past enshrines is included on the website www.eshalloffame.org.

 




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