In the news...

October 9, 2012

NASA aerodynamics legend enters Aviation Hall of Fame

Aeronautics engineer Richard T. Whitcomb, whose legendary NASA research contributions made supersonic flight practical, will joined other aerospace pioneers in the National Aviation Hall of Fame Oct. 6.

The National Aviation Hall of Fame, located at the National Museum of the United States Air Force in Dayton, Ohio, is dedicated to honoring individuals who have contributed uniquely to America’s rich legacy of aviation achievement. In the past 50 years, it has inducted more than 200 of the nation’s premier air and space pioneers, including the Wright brothers, Amelia Earhart, Charles Lindbergh and astronauts John Glenn, Neil Armstrong, and others.

Whitcomb, who died in 2009 at age 88, may not be as much of a household name as others in the Hall of Fame, but aerospace professionals say his role in aeronautics research is virtually unmatched.

“During his almost four decades of federal service, Whitcomb’s fundamental insight into aerodynamics and his practical solutions led to three of the most significant and practical contributions to aeronautics in the 20th century,” said Lesa Roe, director of NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va.

Those three contributions include the area rule, supercritical wing, and winglets.

Whitcomb spent his 37-year career at Langley, arriving fresh out of college in 1943. Nine years later in 1952, the young aeronautics engineer discovered and experimentally verified a revolutionary aircraft design principle that became known as the area rule. Whitcomb discovered if he narrowed the fuselage of a transonic airplane so it is shaped more like an old-fashioned soda bottle, he could reduce its drag and increase its speed without adding power. The area rule has been applied to almost every U.S. supersonic aircraft designed. The achievement earned Whitcomb the prestigious 1954 Collier Trophy for the most important aeronautical advance of the year.

Whitcomb’s supercritical wing revolutionized the design of jet liners in the 1960s. The key was the development of a swept-back wing airfoil that delayed the onset of increased drag, increasing the fuel efficiency of aircraft flying close to the speed of sound.

In the 1970s Whitcomb came up with winglets, wingtip devices that reduce yet another type of drag and further improve aerodynamic efficiency. Many aircraft currently sport wingtips that are angled up for better fuel performance.

Whitcomb received the National Medal of Science from President Richard Nixon in 1973, the U.S. Air Force Exceptional Service medal in 1955, the first National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics’ (NASA’s predecessor) Distinguished Service Medal in 1956, the NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal in 1959 and the National Aeronautics Association’s Wright Brothers Memorial Trophy in 1974. The engineer also was inducted into the National Inventors’ Hall of Fame in 2003, the National Academy of Engineering in 1976 for his pioneering research in the aerodynamic design of high performance aircraft, and the Paul E. Garber First Flight Shrine at the Wright Brothers National Memorial in North Carolina. Whitcomb’s alma mater, Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Massachusetts, awarded him an honorary doctorate and its presidential medal.

Being inducted into the National Aviation Hall of Fame along with Whitcomb are well-known aviation artist Keith Ferris, female aviation pioneer Geraldine Cobb, and the late Elwood Quesada, an Air Force general and pilot who in 1929 helped develop and demonstrate air-to-air refueling and was the first commander of the USAF Tactical Air Command and the first head of the Federal Aviation Administration. The ceremonies will held at the Dayton Convention Center in Dayton, Ohio.

To see a video of Whitcomb’s accomplishments, go to http://alturl.com/frx3a.

 




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Headlines August 22, 2014

News: GAO: Pentagon violated law with Bergdahl swap - Congressional investigators say the Pentagon violated the law when it swapped five Taliban leaders for Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, who was held prisoner in Afghanistan for five years.   Business: U.S. Air Force issues RFI for new rocket engine - The US Air Force is officially looking into...
 
 

News Briefs August 22, 2014

U.S. military deaths in Afghanistan at 2,200 As of Aug. 20, 2014, at least 2,200 members of the U.S. military had died in Afghanistan as a result of the U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan in late 2001, according to an Associated Press count. At least 1,821 military service members have died in Afghanistan as a result...
 
 
navair-triton

MQ-4C Tritons to arrive at Pax River this fall

  MQ-4C Triton test air vehicles at Northrop Grumman’s facility in Palmdale, Calif., will fly cross-country to Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md., this fall. The MQ-4C completed a test flight Aug. 19 with updated ...
 

 
Boeing photograph

Boeing program completes critical design, safety reviews

Boeing photograph Boeing recently completed the Phase Two Spacecraft Safety Review of its Crew Space Transportation-100 spacecraft and the Critical Design Review of its integrated systems, meeting all of the companyís Commerci...
 
 
global-hawk2

Air Combat Command loans Global Hawk to GVCTF

Air Force photograph by Jennifer Romo The 412th Test Wing’s Global Vigilance Combined Test Force received a Global Hawk Block 40 Aug. 6, on loan from Air Combat Command. Tail number 2035, from Grand Forks AFB, N.D., is jo...
 
 

NASA awards program analysis, Control Bridge III Contract

NASA has awarded the Program Analysis and Control III Bridge contract for support services to ASRC Research & Technology Solutions of Beltsville, Md. The cost-plus-fixed-fee, indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity basic contract has a minimum ordering value of $1 million and a maximum ordering value of $37 million, with a performance period beginning Aug. 30 through Feb....
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>