Space

October 12, 2012

Intelsat accepts second on-orbit Boeing 702MP satellite

EL SEGUNDO, Calif. – Intelsat S.A. has accepted its second Boeing 702MP (Medium Power) satellite, Intelsat 21, which was launched Aug. 18 and is enhancing Intelsat’s broadcast and communications services throughout four continents.

Boeing introduced the 702MP spacecraft line in 2009 to meet customer requirements for satellites with 6 to 12 kilowatts of power. The 702MP provides the high capability of the flight-proven Boeing 702HP (High Power) model, but with a modified bus structure and a simplified propulsion system.

“Intelsat 21 has entered service and is enabling Intelsat to expand its global mobility network for maritime and aeronautical customers,” said Craig Cooning, CEO of Boeing Satellite Systems International and vice president of Boeing Space & Intelligence Systems. “This 702MP is the second Boeing-built satellite to be accepted by Intelsat in just four months’ time.”

Replacing Intelsat 9, Intelsat 21 features mobility services spanning the Atlantic Ocean to Europe, Africa and South America. Designed to provide more than 15 years of service, Intelsat 21 also hosts a leading C-band video distribution neighborhood for Latin America with connectivity from Europe and North America. Its Ku-band service will serve direct-to-home programmers in Mexico and corporate network customers in Brazil. Intelsat’s global broadband mobility platform is set for completion in early 2013.

Intelsat is the leading provider of satellite services worldwide. For over 45 years, Intelsat has been delivering information and entertainment for many of the world’s leading media and network companies, multinational corporations, Internet service providers and governmental agencies. Intelsat’s satellite, teleport and fiber infrastructure is unmatched in the industry, setting the standard for transmissions of video, data and voice services. From the globalization of content and the proliferation of HD, to the expansion of cellular networks and broadband access, with Intelsat, advanced communications anywhere in the world are closer, by far.

 




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