Business

October 12, 2012

Northrop Grumman begins production of EHF SatCom system for B-2 bomber

PALMDALE, Calif. – The U.S. Air Force’s fleet of B-2 stealth bombers will begin receiving new high-speed processing subsystems under a $108 million low rate initial production contract awarded Sept. 28 to Northrop Grumman.

The new hardware and software – which include an integrated processing unit, a high-capacity disk drive, and a network of fiber optic cable – will allow the aircraft to perform advanced communications and weapons delivery missions in the future. The new subsystems are being produced as part of Increment 1 of the Air Force’s B-2 extremely high frequency (EHF) satellite communications program.

Northrop Grumman is the Air Force’s prime contractor for the B-2 Spirit, the flagship of the nation’s long-range strike arsenal and one of the world’s most survivable aircraft systems. The B-2 is the only combat-proven stealth platform in the current U.S. inventory.

“The EHF Increment 1 upgrades provide a smart, cost-effective way to enable future combat capability on the B-2,” said Ron Naylor, director of B-2 modernization and transformation for Northrop Grumman. “Every current and future upgrade program for the jet will benefit from the quantum leap in processing power and data handling capacity provided by this new hardware and software.”

In late July, the EHF Increment 1 hardware and software successfully completed a series of operational tests conducted by the Air Force, Naylor said. The company is also beginning to install the new subsystems in a limited number of aircraft as part of the current EHF Increment 1 system development and demonstration contract.

Each new EHF Increment 1 hardware kit includes:

  • An integrated processing unit developed by Lockheed Martin Systems Integration, Owego, N.Y., that will replace up to a dozen current stand-alone avionics computers on the B-2;
  • A disk drive unit developed by Honeywell Defense and Space Electronic Systems, Plymouth, Minn., that will enable transfer of EHF data onto and off of the B-2; and
  • A network of fiber optic cable that will support the high-speed data transfers within the aircraft.

 

The B-2 is the only long-range, large-payload U.S. aircraft that can penetrate deeply into access-denied airspace. In concert with the Air Force’s air superiority fleet, which provides airspace control, and the Air Force’s tanker fleet, which enables global mobility, the B-2 can help protect U.S. interests anywhere in the world. It can fly more than 6,000 nautical miles unrefueled and more than 10,000 nautical miles with just one aerial refueling, giving it the ability to reach any point on the globe within hours.

 




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Headlines March 6, 2015

News: IG: VHA misappropriated $92.5M for claims system - The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) misappropriated more than $90 million intended for medical support and compliance programs in order to build an automated claims processing system, according to an Inspector General report released this week.   Business: Gulf arms race fuels UAE push for defense industry - Soaring...
 
 

News Briefs March 6, 2015

Man charged with theft of military documents seeks release An engineer who worked for a defense contractor who’s been charged with attempting to travel to China with stolen documents on the development of advanced titanium for U.S. military aircraft is asking a judge to free him while he awaits trial. A hearing on Yu Long’s...
 
 
Air Force photograph by Rick Goodfriend

AFRL offering prize for turbine engine development

Air Force photograph by Rick Goodfriend Discover meetings to be held in Ohio on March 24-25. The Air Force Research Laboratory is leading the first Air Force technology prize, issuing a challenge to develop a small, efficient t...
 

 
Lockheed Martin photograph

Lockheed Martin P-3 Orion wing line restarted

Lockheed Martin photograph From left: Peter Hillier, Karen Eilbmeier, and Michael Spurr from the Canada Department of National Defence were on hand to commemorate the reopening of the P-3 wing line at Marietta, Ga.   Lockh...
 
 
Army photograph

Army Research Laboratory lays out science and technology priorities through 2019

Army photograph Dr. Rick Beyer, propulsion science expert, aligns a sample in a Bruker Wide-angle X-ray scattering camera at the Army Research Laboratory in Adelphi, Md. The laboratory recently released its technical implementa...
 
 
Air Force photograph by A1C Dillian Bamman

‘Iron Horse’ sets off for final flight

Air Force photograph by A1C Dillian Bamman Aircraft 62-1863 ‘Iron Horse’, a HC-130P Combat King, rests before takeoff Mar. 3, 2015, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Throughout its career, Iron Horse has flown for over 27,000 ho...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>