Events

October 18, 2012

Bikers raise money for Fallen Heroes

Riders get ready to hit the road during the 10th Annual High Desert Fallen Heroes ride in Lancaster, Calif. The event, dedicated to Fire Capt. Ted Hall and Fire Fighter Specialist Arnie Quinones helps support the families of firemen, police and other public servants who lost their lives in the line of duty.

High gas prices didn’t curtail more than 300 registered riders and other guests attending the 10th annual High Desert Fallen Heroes poker run held Oct. 7, at Harley-Davidson in Lancaster, Calif.

The event is dedicated to Fire Capt. Ted Hall and Fire Fighter Specialist Arnie Quinones and supports the families of firemen, police and other public servants who lost their lives in the line of duty.

“This is a wonderful event,” said Ron Emard, owner of Harley-Davidson. “It gives me a warm feeling to see so many people come together for such a good cause.”

Guests are not required to ride in the poker run in order to enjoy live music, barbecue and cold beer.

Kevin Medina, a program manager for Global Vigilance CTF at Edwards AFB, enjoys this event in particular because everyone starts off together.

“It’s nothing but bikes for miles with emergency vehicles escorting you down the 14.” At his day job Medina works with Predators, Reapers and Army Gray Eagles. On weekends he enjoys a nice ride. “You always meet good people at these events.”

People of all ages relax while listening to the Bullfrogg Blues Band at the 10th Annual High Desert Fallen Heroes ride and poker run. Participation in the ride is not a requirement to enjoy live music, refreshments and barbecue.

Singer, guitarist Neil Werner of the Bullfrogg Blues band has been playing this venue since its concept.

“The Out Law Pigs was founded by members of local law enforcement and started this event in 2003. I was there for the first one and I hope I’ll be playing it for another 20,” said Werner.

 




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