Business

October 24, 2012

Raytheon’s Excalibur Ib demonstrates accuracy during flight tests

Raytheon has fired eight precision-guided Excalibur Ib projectiles during qualification flight tests at Yuma Proving Ground, Ariz.

All eight rounds landed within five meters of the target, meeting stringent test objectives.

“This program has made great achievements in a very short amount of time,” said Lt. Col. Josh Walsh, the U.S. Army Excalibur program manager. “In two years time, the Excalibur Ib program has moved from a competition to being well on its way to a milestone C.”

The Excalibur Ib is a precision-guided artillery projectile based on Raytheon’s combat-proven Excalibur Ia. The tests verify the performance and efficacy of the Excalibur Ib configuration.

“Our team is focused on giving our war fighters an Excalibur Ib design that improves performance and reliability,” said Kevin Matthies, Raytheon Missile Systems’ Excalibur program director. “These tests verify the new design.”

With more than 600 rounds fired in theater to date, Excalibur is the revolutionary precision projectile for the U.S. Army and Marine Corps artillery. By integrating Excalibur into close-combat formations, U.S. forces avoid collateral damage even when war fighters are in close proximity to the target. By using Excalibur’s level of precision there is a major reduction in the time, cost and logistical burden traditionally associated with using artillery munitions. Analyses have shown that on average it takes at least 10 conventional munitions to accomplish what one Excalibur can.

Successfully fielded in 2007, the Excalibur 155mm precision-guided, extended-range projectile is the revolutionary artillery round used in theater today by the U.S. Army and Marine Corps. Using GPS precision guidance technology, Excalibur provides accurate, first round, fire-for-effect capability in an urban setting. Excalibur is considered a true precision weapon, impacting at a radial miss distance of six meters from the target. Excalibur is a co-development program between Raytheon Company and BAE Bofors.

 




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