Business

October 26, 2012

GA-ASI successfully tests ADS-B surveillance system aboard Guardian

General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc. announced Oct. 25 the successful demonstration of an Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B)-based surveillance system that provides pilots with enhanced situational awareness and supports GA-ASI’s overall airborne sense-and-avoid architecture for its Predator(R) B RPA.

GA-ASI is a leading manufacturer of Remotely Piloted Aircraft, tactical reconnaissance radars, and electro-optic surveillance systems.

The purpose of the test was to demonstrate that the Predator/Gray Eagle(R)-series aircraft can fly cooperatively and safely in the National Airspace System, allowing Air Traffic Control to know their location and flight profiles precisely.

BAE Systems provided a prototype of its Reduced Size Transponder, which has recently received the designation AN/DPX-7. The AN/DPX-7 is a military grade Identification Friend or Foe transponder that interoperates with both military and civilian ATC surveillance systems and is ADS-B-capable.

“We are working closely with the FAA [Federal Aviation Administration], other governmental agencies, and industry partners to advance the safety of RPA”, said Frank W. Pace, president, Aircraft Systems Group, GA-ASI. “We believe ADS-B will play a key role in a future sense-and-avoid system and will support the FAA’s ‘Next Gen’ initiative, so this is a step in the right direction.”

Installed on a Guardian RPA, a Predator B configured for maritime operations, the prototype’s first successful flight test occurred on August 10 off the Florida coast. During the test, held in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Customs and Border Protection, and the FAA, Guardian’s ADS-B IN-capable transponder detected other ADS-B-equipped aircraft in the vicinity and displayed the aircraft on a display within the Ground Control Station. Concurrently, Guardian’s ADS-B OUT transponder notified other aircraft and ATC of its location and velocity.

ADS-B is the GPS-based surveillance system that is the cornerstone of the FAA’s “Next Gen” Air Traffic Management system, which aims to convert America’s ATC system from a ground-based system to a satellite-based system, resulting in simplified air traffic logistics and enhanced aircraft safety margins. The FAA has mandated that all aircraft flying above 10,000 feet or around major U.S. airports must be ADS-B equipped by 2020.

The results of the demonstration follows GA-ASI’s successful 2011 test of a prototype airborne Due Regard Radar aboard a manned aircraft. Based upon an X-band Active Electronically Scanned Array radar, the capability will work in tandem with ADS-B to improve Predator B’s capacity to participate safely in domestic and international airspace, thus ensuring its interoperability with civilian air traffic and airspace rules and regulations.

 




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Navy photograph

NAWCWD manned for unmanned systems

Navy photograph A rail launch is performed during Integrator unmanned aerial vehicle testing at Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division China Lake, Calif. Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division scientists, engineers, techn...
 
 
NASA photograph by Ken Ulbrich

NASA employees go ‘above and beyond’

Courtesy photograph NASA Chief Scientist Albion Bowers, Christopher Miller and Nelson Brown receive the Exception Engineering Achievement Medal at Armstrong Research Center, Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. The prestigious award ...
 
 
Photograph by Tom Reynolds

Engineers, test pilots enjoy Mojave tradition

Photograph by Tom Reynolds Engineer and pilot students who recently graduated from the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School from Patuxent River, Md., and the USAF Test Pilot school at Edwards AFB kept with a 17 year old tradition, enjo...
 

 
nasa-global-hawk

Global Hawk 872 return marks 100th NASA flight

  NASA Global Hawk No. 872 is pictured on the ramp after landing at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility, Va., at sunrise following its 10th and final science flight Sept. 28–29 in the agency’s 2014 Hurricane and S...
 
 

Northrop Grumman hand held precision targeting device completes successful developmental test

A new hand held targeting system developed by Northrop Grumman that will enable soldiers to engage targets with precision munitions while providing digital connectivity to related military units has successfully completed developmental testing at White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. The evaluation of the company’s Hand Held Precision Targeting Device, or HHPTD, was conducted...
 
 
Photograph by Linda KC Reynolds

Educating future workers

Photograph by Linda KC Reynolds Antelope Valley College physics professor Christos Valiotis and assistant headmaster at the Palmdale Aerospace Academy, Matthew Winheim, speak at the Antelope Valley Board of Trade Luncheon. The ...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>