In the news...

October 29, 2012

News Briefs – October 29, 2012

Navy sending fewer ship mattresses to landfills

The Navy is sending fewer of its shipboard mattresses to landfills.

The mattresses from two Virginia-based aircraft carriers and another ship are having their parts recycled by a South Carolina company this year for other uses.

In all, the Navy plans to recycle 13,000 mattresses from the USS Enterprise, USS Abraham Lincoln and USS Mesa Verde as part of the pilot program.

Navy officials say it is less expensive to recycle the mattresses than send them to a landfill. Recycling mattress material will also save more than 100,000 cubic feet of landfill space.

Gregory Jeanguenat, Naval Station Norfolk’s Integrated Solid Waste and Recycling Site manager, says he hopes the program will expand to other ships, barracks and Navy lodges in the future. AP

Talks under way with on base use

Britain’s government says it is involved in military contingency planning with the United States on potential flashpoints in the Middle East – but insists it doesn’t support any imminent strike on Iran’s nuclear sites.

Prime Minister David Cameron’s office confirmed Oct. 26 that planning is being carried out with the U.S. and other allies, including on the potential use by American forces of British bases overseas.

It follows a report by The Guardian newspaper that the U.S. has asked Britain to use its bases in Cyprus, and British territory in the Atlantic and Indian Ocean, to build up forces in the Gulf. It reported the move was a contingency for potential strikes on Tehran’s nuclear program.

Cameron’s office said discussions were taking place, but declined to specify the details. AP

Michoud ready for deep-space rocket project

A month after the space shuttle Endeavour passed over the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans on its final journey to California, NASA officials this week looked to the future as they gave business owners from across the country an update on the Space Launch System, a new mega-rocket designed to transport astronauts to deep space.

The session drew more than 150 people from dozens of businesses, including some already partnering on the project and others interested in working alongside one of its major contractors, like Boeing, said Todd May, the manager of the program, The Times-Picayune reports.

Hundreds of high-paying jobs are expected to be added when construction on the program reaches its peak, starting next year and leveling off in 2015 May said. AP

Boeing broke labor law at SC plant

An administrative law judge says the Boeing broke national labor law when a human resources manager at its North Charleston, S.C., plant told a mechanic not to talk about unionizing during working time.

The Post and Courier of Charleston reports Oct. 28 that Judge William Nelson Cates says Boeing can’t prohibit employees from discussing the union while allowing discussion of non-work-related matters during working time.

Cates ordered Boeing to stop the practice and also required the manufacturer to post a notice that notifies employees of their right to organize.

A Boeing spokeswoman said the company is disappointed with the decision and disputes the findings.

Representatives of the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers brought the unfair labor practice charge on behalf of the mechanic this spring. AP




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
VG01

Space tourism rocket explodes in desert

MOJAVE, Calif. – A Virgin Galactic space tourism rocket exploded Oct. 31 during a test flight, killing a pilot aboard and seriously injuring another while scattering wreckage in Southern California’s Mojave Desert, ...
 
 

Headlines October 29, 2014

News: Unmanned rocket explodes just six seconds after taking off - A NASA rocket due to be visible across the East Coast on its way to the International Space Station has blown up on the Launchpad. IG: Former chief of wounded warrior office broke law, DOD regs - The Defense Department inspector general has recommended “corrective action”...
 
 

News Briefs October 29, 2014

F-35C makes first landing at Virginia Beach Navy base The Navy says an operational F-35C joint strike fighter has landed at Naval Air Station Oceana for the first time. Naval Air Station Oceana is the Navy’s master jet base on the East Coast. The Navy says the plane came to the Virginia Beach base Oct....
 

 

Time to turn to American technology for space launch

For the first time since the Cold War, the United States has deployed armored reinforcements to Europe. To counter Russia’s aggression, several hundred troops and 20 tanks are now in the Baltic. Yet the U.S. military is still injecting millions into the Russian military industrial complex. In late August, the United Launch Alliance – the...
 
 
Air Force photograph by Joe Davila

Boeing, Air Force demonstrate Minuteman III readiness in flight test

Air Force photograph by Joe Davila Boeing supported the launch of an unarmed Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., on Sept. 23, 2014. Boeing supported the U.S. Air Force’s succ...
 
 

Pentagon going to court for refusing to release Sikorsky data

PETALUMA, Calif. – The Pentagon is refusing to release any data on any prime contractors participating in the 25-year-old Comprehensive Subcontracting Plan Test Program. The American Small Business League launched a program in 2010 to expose the fraud and abuse against small businesses the CSPTP had allowed. As a test the ASBL requested the most...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>