Defense

November 7, 2012

Army adapting to face ‘deep future’ threats

During the recent 2012 Association of the United States Army’s Annual Meeting and Exposition, members of the Institute of Land Warfare’s “Thinking Past Tomorrow – Where is the Army Going?” panel described the Army of the future, with a focus on the concepts and capabilities needed to meet future unknown threats.

“We, as an Army, have to develop a deep concept,” said Lt. Gen. Keith Walker, deputy commanding general of Futures and director of U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command’s Army Capabilities Integration Center. “That means looking out as far as 2030. The Army has not had a ‘deep’ concept in quite a while.”

As the Army examines long-term planning, changes to doctrine and training, future threat assessments, capability gaps and a whole host of advancements in technology, the goal is to mitigate and reduce security threats to the future forces – providing soldiers with increased sustainability and mobility.

“We must be more efficient in everything we do,” said Heidi Shyu, assistant secretary of the Army, Acquisition, Logistics and Technology, listing numerous ways the Army is upgrading Soldiers’ battle gear while decreasing the weight they must carry to complete missions.

As the Army begins to implement the latest Network Integration Evaluation, which Shyu described as the “adaptive and evolutionary approach to designing, integrating and maturing the Army’s tactical network and capabilities,” leaders are already seeing positive results.

“[Network Integration Evaluation] brings soldiers, materiel developers, engineers and testers together to test new technologies in a combat environment,” added Walker. “We give the soldiers a chance to use new equipment and tell us what they think – and they don’t hold back.”

By adapting and modernizing how the Army operates and developing field network technologies asynchronously, the Army has cut costs and bureaucratic processes that have slowed down progress in the past.

“The sooner we can get new technologies in the hands of our soldiers, the sooner we can stop doing things that are [ineffective],” said Walker.

As the Army moves forward, the panel’s experts acknowledged the future is still unknown, but one thing is certain: with the Network Integration Evaluation, the Army has a new way of doing business and the change will be for the better.

 




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Headlines March 30, 2015

News: Pentagon chief mulls easing military enlistment standards - Defense Secretary Ash Carter is considering easing some military enlistment standards as part of a broader set of initiatives to better attract and keep quality service members and civilians across the Defense Department.   Business: Lockheed pays $2 million to settle government overbilling charges - Lockheed Martin Corpor...
 
 

News Briefs March 30, 2015

Landing mishap for military chopper; two aboard unhurt Two Navy officers were unhurt after their helicopter rolled on its side while landing in the Florida Panhandle. The mishap happened the night of March 27 at a Navy landing site in Pensacola, Fla. The Pensacola News Journal reports a pilot instructor and a student were able...
 
 
Air Force photograph by TSgt. Matt Hecht

Laser-based aircraft countermeasure provides ‘unlimited rounds’ against MANPADS

Air Force photograph by TSgt. Matt Hecht A U.S. Army AH-64 Apache attack helicopter prepares to depart Bagram Air Field, Afghanistan, on Jan 7, 2012. The Apache conducts distributed operations, precision strikes against relocat...
 

 

Navy, Air Force advocate for modernizing combat aviation

Top Navy and Air Force officials today told the House Armed Services subcommittee on tactical air and land forces the president’s budget request for fiscal year 2016 will support modernizing combat aviation programs. Cavy Vice Adm. Paul A. Grosklags, principal military deputy to the assistant secretary of the Navy for research, development and acquisitions; Air...
 
 

Raytheon wins $46 million contract for South Korean Global Hawk ground stations

Raytheon has been awarded a contract valued at up to $45.7 million by Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems for ground segments in support of four Global Hawk unmanned aircraft systems recently purchased by the Republic of Korea. Under this contract, Raytheon will deliver one building-based and one mobile ground segment to locations in South Korea. Work...
 
 
Air Force photograph by SrA. Victor J. Caputo

McConnell community marks B-29 rollout

Air Force photograph by SrA. Victor J. Caputo A B-29 Superfortress aircraft, named Doc after its nose art, sit on the flightline March 23, 2015, in Wichita, Kan. Doc will be one of two Superfortresses in the world capable of fl...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>