Defense

November 9, 2012

Air Force senior leaders approve doctrine restructure

Officials at the LeMay Center for Doctrine Development and Education at Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala., announce that by next fall, Air Force doctrine will be restructured, streamlined and accessible to anyone with an e-reader, smartphone or tablet.

Dubbed “Doctrine Next,” the initiative overhauls doctrine development processes to better reflect Air Force and Joint “best practices” in a much timelier manner while reducing subject matter redundancy and repetitive content.

In early October, the LeMay Center presented Doctrine Next to senior Air Force leaders at the annual Doctrine Summit held at the Air Force Academy. The leaders unanimously supported the initiative and tasked the Center to proceed with immediate implementation.

“Doctrine Next is a totally new way we will develop and present our doctrine,” said Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Mark A. Welsh III. “Any opportunity we have to streamline and improve the timeliness of Air Force doctrine will have an immediate impact on the way we team with Joint and Coalition partners.”

Currently, the complete list of Air Force doctrine includes 32 singularly focused publications that amass more than 2,600 pages. Doctrine Next dramatically reduces that page count and aligns the doctrine into five unifying volumes and 28 supporting annexes. The five volumes will be Air Force Basic Doctrine; Leadership and Force Development; Commanding and Organizing Air Force Forces; Operations; and Support.

Each annex will be derived from the current library of doctrine publications and rewritten to focus on the five unifying documents.

“The annexes will be all doctrine, no filler,” said Lt. Col. Brian Thompson, LeMay Center’s Doctrine Development Directorate. “One of the immediate effects of eliminating non-doctrinal text is a 30 percent word-count reduction across the entire Air Force doctrine library.”

“Doctrine Next fundamentally improves the alignment, currency, accessibility, readability and ultimately the relevance of our Air Force Doctrine … our service’s best practices,” said Maj. Gen. Tom Andersen, commander of the LeMay Center.

Airmen should start seeing newly formatted annexes by May 2013, with full implementation not later than Oct. 1, 2013.

 




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Air Force photo by Ken LaRock

First aviation mechanic display added to the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force

Air Force photo by Ken LaRock A bronze bust honoring the first aviation mechanic, Charles E. Taylor, is now on permanent display in the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force’s Early Years Gallery. The museum is located ne...
 
 
United Kingdom Ministry of Defense photograph

Army researchers develop Cargo Pocket ISR

United Kingdom Ministry of Defense photograph A British soldier holds Prox Dynamics’ PD-100 Black Hornet, a palm-sized miniature helicopter weighing only 16 grams. Researchers with the U.S. Army Natick Soldier Research, D...
 
 
Army photograph by Charles Kennedy

New CT scanner finds diverse, important uses for researchers

Army photograph by Charles Kennedy Turning a now-standard tool for medical diagnostics and therapeutics to a host of new applications, the U. S. Army Research Laboratory’s Survivability/Lethality Analysis Directorate rece...
 

 
Army photograph by David Kamm

Chow from a 3-D printer? Natick researchers are working on it

Army photograph by David Kamm Natick food technologists already believe they serve up the best food science can offer. Now they are working to incorporate 3-D printing technology into foods for the war fighter. Army researchers...
 
 
Air Force photograph by A1C Alexander Guerrero

Weapons School students get first look at upgraded B-1s

Air Force photograph by A1C Alexander Guerrero Maj. Brad Weber checks a screen that displays diagnostic information May 7, 2014, at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. The IBS is a combination of three different upgrades, which includ...
 
 
arnold-a10

A-10 ‘Warthog’ tested in 16-T

Air Force photograph A model of an A-10 Thunderbolt II, more commonly known as “The Warthog” due to its unique shape, recently underwent a pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) test in Arnold Engineering Development Complex’s 16...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>