Business

November 9, 2012

Sikorsky employes HUMS data to extend life of S-92 main rotor hub

Sikorsky Aircraft Corp. has received Federal Aviation Administration approval to grant life extensions for the Main Rotor Hub on the company’s S-92(r) helicopter platform.

Through its aftermarket business, Sikorsky Aerospace Services, Sikorsky Aircraft will have the ability to utilize Health and Usage Monitoring System data to determine a one-time life adjustment for particular serial number main rotor hubs in accordance with a methodology accepted by the FAA.

“Beyond monitoring for failure prevention, we have now advanced the usage of HUMS data into the realm of operating cost reductions,” said Steve Bohlman, SAS director, Global Service & Support. “By obtaining FAA approval for our methodology, we have achieved an industry first. Extending the life of a component through individual aircraft usage monitoring is an important first step in using HUMS data to proactively reduce the operating and maintenance cost of the S-92 aircraft.”

The S-92 helicopter incorporates numerous safety features, including a flaw tolerant design, and Sikorsky continues to make safety and performance upgrades. HUMS provides another safety enhancement by allowing the SAS Fleet Management Operations Center in Connecticut to monitor, on a continual basis, the health of the worldwide S-92 helicopter fleet. Data collected by the FMOC helps identify maintenance conditions including whether components are wearing as expected.

The life calculation of the S-92A(tm) Main Rotor Hub is significantly influenced by rotor blade centrifugal force and the number of Ground-Air-Ground cycles. Based on Sikorsky’s FAA-approved life calculation methodology, the recommended retirement time for the hub is 4,900 hours. Sikorsky engineering teams have developed a new method for managing the retirement time of the rotor hub. This FAA-approved methodology accounts for actual usage and permits a one-time life extension, while maintaining the same margin of safety.

“The success of this simple HUMS-based retirement procedure serves as a precursor for implementing more sophisticated technologies to manage component retirement times,” said Dr. Andreas Bernhard, SAS Director of Analytics & Technology and Chief Engineer. “This paradigm change will result in significant cost savings and reduction of the operator’s maintenance burden – as well as impact the design of new products. These types of methodologies can realize optimal weight design and achieve reliability through continuous monitoring of usage, loads, and health.”

 




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Headlines July 21, 2014

News: IDF releases Iron Dome interception rate - Israel’s Iron Dome system has successfully intercepted 86 percent of the Palestinian rockets that it has engaged during Operation ‘Protective Edge’, according to the Israel Defense Forces.   Business: The turnaround of France’s defense giant Thales - Within seconds of meeting Jean-Bernard Levy it becomes apparent that h...
 
 

News Briefs July 21, 2014

Corruption investigated in Kansas National Guard The Kansas Adjutant General’s office says federal authorities are investigating possible corruption involving outside medical companies’ contracts with the Kansas Army National Guard. Sharon Watson, spokeswoman for the adjutant general’s office, confirmed the investigation Friday to The Lawrence Journal-World but declined to rel...
 
 
Air Force photograph by Rick Goodfriend

B61 undergoes testing in AEDC wind tunnel

Air Force photograph by Rick Goodfriend Arnold Engineering Development Complex engineers recently joined researchers with Sandia National Laboratories to perform a wind tunnel test on a full-scale mock-up B61. Pictured with the...
 

 
Army photograph by Charles Kennedy

New CT scanner finds diverse, important uses for researchers

Army photograph by Charles Kennedy Turning a now-standard tool for medical diagnostics and therapeutics to a host of new applications, the U. S. Army Research Laboratory’s Survivability/Lethality Analysis Directorate rece...
 
 

Ingalls Shipbuilding awarded $23.5 million LHA 8 affordability contract

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ Ingalls Shipbuilding division has been awarded an affordability design contract for $23.5 million for early industry involvement to reduce the construction and life-cycle cost for the amphibious assault ship LHA 8. “Ingalls Shipbuilding has been constructing large-deck amphibious ships for nearly 50 years, and this contract will build on our company...
 
 
Marine Corps photograph

DOD identifies missing World War II Marine

Marine Corps photograph Marines wounded during the landing on Tarawa in November 1943 are towed out on rubber boats to larger vessels that will take them to base hospitals. The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>