Defense

November 14, 2012

‘Business as usual’ encompasses much for U.S., Australia

The annual Australia-United States Ministerial Consultations in Perth, Australia, was very much a “business as usual” conference that checked the state of the alliance and charted the way forward for the two countries.

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta met Nov. 14 with their Australian counterparts, Foreign Minister Bob Carr and Defense Minister Stephen Smith. Nov. 13, the four met with Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard.

The U.S. and Australian ministers spoke with reporters at the Curtin House following their meetings today.

Carr said the meetings yielded no huge announcements and consisted mainly of consultation and reports on how previous decisions are being implemented.

The four discussed the U.S. Marine rotation to Darwin in northern Australia, Carr said. “We welcome the success of the first rotation, … and we look forward to the next rotation in 2013,” he added. The 250-Marine contingent in the recent rotation is scheduled to increase to 1,100 next year, and up to 2,500 over the next five years.

The four discussed additional possibilities for military cooperation in the Asia-Pacific region, Carr said, specifically U.S. use of Australian ports and airfields. All agreed this needs more study, he added.

Clinton called the U.S.-Australian alliance “an anchor of peace and prosperity in the Asia-Pacific and around the world, forged in war, but flourishing in peace.”

The four ministers discussed Afghanistan and the way forward in that nation, she said. “We honor the service and sacrifice of our Australian allies,” the secretary said. “We are on track to transition full responsibility to the Afghan government by the end of 2014, and we are also focused on economic and political transitions.”

The four talked about broader regional and global issues. Throughout the Indian and Pacific oceans, the American and Australian navies work together to protect the seaways through which much of the world’s trade passes. “Increasingly, our cybersecurity experts cooperate to keep our networks safe and our online commerce flowing smoothly,” Clinton said.

The secretary of state also congratulated the Australian Parliament for approving the U.S.-Australian Defense Trade Cooperation Treaty. “This agreement will boost trade and help our companies collaborate more closely and spur innovation,” she said. “It’s a definite win-win.”

Australia and the United States agreed on the way forward on Iran, Clinton said, noting that both countries want the international community to remain united to stop Iran from obtaining nuclear weapons.

And the ministers discussed the on-going situation in Syria, the secretary said. “We agreed today that the formation of the new Syrian opposition coalition is an important step forward and will help us better target our assistance,” she added.

The secretary announced the United States will provide another $30 million of humanitarian assistance to the people of Syria and to the thousands of Syrian refugees in Turkey, Jordan, Lebanon and Iraq. This will bring the total for U.S. humanitarian assistance to $200 million, she said.

The United States and Australia will work with China and with the members of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations to develop “a code of conduct for the South China Sea, supporting continued reforms in Burma and pushing the peaceful, verifiable denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula,” she said.

The United States will host next year’s conference.

 




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Headlines May 27, 2015

News: U.S. Air Force certifies SpaceX for military launches - SpaceX has been certified for military space launch, the U.S. Air Force announced May 26. The long-awaited announcement is a game changer, with SpaceX becoming only the second provider cleared by the service to launch national security payloads into orbit.   Business: Northrop Grumman CEO issues...
 
 

New’s Briefs May 27, 2015

U.S. military begins search flights for stranded Rohingya The United States has begun military surveillance flights to help locate stranded Rohingya and Bangladeshi boat people in Southeast Asian seas. State Department spokesman Jeff Rathke said May 26 that U.S. Navy P8 aircraft flew over the weekend with Malaysian support. Rathke said the U.S. has offered...
 
 
nasa-commercial-crew

Commercial Crew milestones met; partners on track for 2017 missions

NASA has taken another step toward returning America’s ability to launch crew missions to the International Space Station from the United States in 2017. The Commercial Crew Program ordered its first crew rotation mission fro...
 

 
af-spacex

Air Force certifies SpaceX for national security space missions

Lt. Gen. Samuel Greaves, commander of the Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center and Air Force program executive officer for space, has announced the certification of Space Exploration Technologies Corporation’s Falco...
 
 

Northrop Grumman passes key design review for B-2 weapons management upgrade

Northrop Grumman has successfully demonstrated to the U.S. Air Force that its plans to upgrade key weapons management software for the B-2 stealth bomber are on track and ready to proceed to the next level of development. The company successfully completed the critical design review of the service’s Flexible Strike Phase 1 program on Feb...
 
 
boeing-space

Boeing awarded first-ever commercial human spaceflight mission

NASA issued a task order as part of Boeing’s $4.2 billion Commercial Crew Transportation Capability contract recently to include the company’s first-ever service flight to the International Space Station. The award ...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>