Business

November 14, 2012

Raytheon achieves critical firsts for U.S. Navy dual-band radar

Raytheon Company has achieved two significant milestones on the Cobra Judy Replacement program, meeting critical performance requirements to advance ongoing system integration.

For the first time, the company demonstrated the full-power radiation capability with the high sensitivity CJR shipboard X- and S-band active phased-array radars. In addition, both the X-band and S-band radars successfully acquired and tracked satellites under the control of the CJR common radar suite controller. Both critical firsts were realized at sea during testing onboard the USNS Howard O. Lorenzen (T-AGM 25).

“These operational successes validate the exceptional design of these radars and significantly advance our progress toward completing integration,” said U.S. Navy Captain Rod Wester, CJR program manager, Program Executive Office – Integrated Warfare Systems. “The dedication of the Raytheon-led team and their experience with large-scale radar development and integration was evident as we worked together to achieve these critical milestones.”

The milestones are the latest in a series of achievements for this true dual-band, active phased-array radar suite. In late 2011, Raytheon completed the shipboard installation of CJR mission equipment at Kiewit Offshore Services, Corpus Christi, Texas, ahead of plan. Shipboard testing of the X-band and S-band arrays with the common radar suite controller commenced directly thereafter and continued as part of the preparation for these critical operational exercises.

The program’s success can be attributed to the collaborative working relationship among Raytheon, Northrop Grumman and the Navy, all executing to a robust incremental development, integration and testing strategy as they advance toward delivery in 2013.

About CJR

Integrated onboard this complex, mission-critical platform, the massive X- and S-band active phased-array antennas of CJR are each approximately four stories tall and weigh more than 500,000 pounds. The mission of the CJR program is to provide the government with long-loiter ballistic missile data collection capability. Its dual-band radar suite consists of X- and S-band phased-array sensors, a common radar suite controller and other related mission equipment.

Raytheon is the prime contractor for the CJR mission equipment and principal on an industry team that includes Northrop Grumman Electronic Systems, General Dynamics SATCOM Technologies, and KOS. The team has been a model of collaboration, focused on the delivery of a high-performing shipboard radar capability that the U.S. Navy can rely upon as a critical fleet asset.

Work on the CJR program is primarily performed at Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems’ Surveillance and Sensors Center, Sudbury, Mass.; Northrop Grumman Electronic Systems, Baltimore, Md.; and Kiewit Offshore Services. The T-AGM 25 ship was built for the Navy by VT Halter Marine, Pascagoula, Miss.

 




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