Defense

November 21, 2012

Safety paramount as F-22 investigation continues

Wreckage of an F-22 Raptor remains at the crash site on Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla., Nov. 15, 2012. Officials with the 325th Fighter Wing are continuing to investigate and secure the scene. The pilot safely ejected from the aircraft and first responders were on the scene in less than two minutes.

The pilot of a F-22 Raptor, assigned to the 43rd Fighter Squadron, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla., safely ejected as the jet crashed Nov. 15 around 3:30 p.m., EDT, on Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla., one-quarter mile east of the drone runway.

Despite initial media speculation, there are no indications that point to the life support system leading to this incident or playing any role in this crash. A thorough investigation is being conducted in accordance with standard Air Force and Department of Defense policy. The pilot was conducting a routine training mission when first responders were alerted of a problem via an in-flight emergency call and were on scene fighting the fire within two minutes of the incident.

“Our first responders reacted quickly and professionally due to the extensive training we conduct here at Tyndall,” said Col. David Graff, 325th Fighter Wing commander. “In addition, the pilot received top-notch care from our medical group.”

A safety team here began interviewing witnesses, maintainers and other individuals immediately after the incident.

“Right now, our number one priority is the safety of our airmen and all involved as we secure the scene of the incident,” Graff said.

The first step taken in the securing process was a sweep by explosive ordnance disposal airmen for any parts of the aircraft that may be explosive.

Follow-on steps include addressing environmental and biological hazards. Most modern aircraft are made of composite fibers, which can create health concerns for people on the scene when the plane catches fire.

A pair of F-22 Raptors fly near the coastline of Panama City Beach, Fla.

First responders at Tyndall AFB are well trained and equipped to respond to aircraft crashes and minimize their effects on surrounding areas, Graff said. Throughout the initial and continued responses all personnel have worn the appropriate protective gear, and they will continue to do so until the immediate site of the crash is deemed safe.

While safety is the primary concern, preserving the accident scene is a critical part of the investigation. All evidence will be photographed and tagged to preserve all evidence for the official safety investigation board members.

 




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Untitled-2

Tactical reconnaissance vehicle project eyes hoverbike for defense

The U.S. Army Research Laboratory, or ARL, has been exploring the tactical reconnaissance vehicle, or TRV, concept for nearly nine months and is evaluating the hoverbike technology as a way to get Soldiers away from ground thre...
 
 
Air Force photograph by SSgt. William Banton

Upgraded AWACS platform tested at Northern Edge

Air Force photograph by SSgt. William Banton Maintenance crew members prepare an E-3G Sentry (AWACS) for takeoff during exercise Northern Edge June 25, 2015. Roughly 6,000 airmen, soldiers, sailors, Marines and Coast Guardsmen ...
 
 
Air Force photograph by SSgt. Marleah Robertson

First Marine graduates Air Force’s F-35 intelligence course

Air Force photograph by SSgt. Marleah Robertson Marine Corps 1st Lt. Samuel Winsted, an F-35B Lightning II intelligence officer, provides a mock intelligence briefing to two instructors during the F-35 Intelligence Formal Train...
 

 
Air Force photograph by SrA. James Richardson

5,000 days of war

Air Force photograph by SrA. James Richardson Airmen from the 17th Special Tactics Squadron out of Fort Benning, Ga., control airspace operations during exercise Jaded Thunder Oct. 29, 2014, in Salina, Kansas. Joint special ope...
 
 
Huntington Ingalls photograph

Navy’s new aircraft launch system tested on future carrier CVN 78

Huntington Ingalls photograph Aboard the aircraft carrier Pre-Commissioning Unit Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78), Susan Ford Bales, the ship’s sponsor and daughter of the late President Ford for whom the ship is named, rejoices i...
 
 
Navy photograph by JO2 John Hetherington

Prowler retires following 45 years of naval service

Navy photograph by PO3 Brian Stephens An EA-6B Prowler assigned to the Garudas of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 134 lands on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). George H.W. Bush is supporti...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>