Space

December 3, 2012

Virgin Galactic selects Quantum3Dís advanced simulation platform for spaceship command training


Quantum3D, Inc., announced Dec. 3 Virgin Galactic, the worldís first commercial spaceline, has ordered Quantum3Dís six-channel IndependenceÆ IDX 7000 image generator.

Quantum 3D is a leading provider of visual computing solutions for government and commercial applications.

Virgin Galactic will use Quantum3Dís most advanced real-time image generator to train pilots on spaceship equipment and command.

Our first priority in sub-orbital space exploration is safety, and by leveraging Quantum3Dís IDX 7000 with the most advanced image generation, we are giving our pilots the best training available for space exploration,î said Keith Colmer, senior test pilot, Virgin Galactic. ìQuantum3D created an impressive high quality database, including imagery of our spaceship models, buildings, hangars, and spaceport to provide the most realistic simulation possible for our pilots, which will assist in creating a space program to support flying almost anyone to space and back safely.

The IDX 7000 offers enhanced performance and capabilities to deliver Virgin Galactic a versatile and powerful simulation and training platform that can be setup in a dedicated room or easily transported, to meet a range of onsite, on-location and mobile training needs.

Combined with MantisÆ shader-based real-time scene management software with geo-specific, worldwide synthetic environments, Virgin Galactic will be able to train their pilots in a variety of simulations, from instrument/cockpit familiarization to a full range of special effects, sensors, weather, and lighting, along with mission-critical functions such as height-above-terrain and line-of-sight intersection testing.

Virgin Galactic is on the cusp of a new frontier ñ making sub-orbital space accessibility a reality,î said Wade Guindy, president, Quantum3D. ìWe are proud to have Virgin Galactic using our IDX 7000 image generator and Mantis software to train their pilots for the future of consumer space travel.




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