Business

December 12, 2012

Boeing delivers first 777-300ER in U.S. to American Airlines

Boeing delivered to American Airlines Dec. 11 its first 777-300ER (extended range) jetliner as part of the airline’s fleet modernization effort and global network strategy. The delivery makes the Fort Worth, Texas-based carrier the first U.S. airline to add the 777-300ER to its fleet.

American Airlines plans for the airplane to enter service in early 2013 on the Dallas/Fort Worth-Sao Paulo route.

“This marks an important milestone in our fleet renewal program and is another tangible example of our progress in building the new American for our customers and our people,” said Bella Goren, American’s chief financial officer. “This aircraft will provide our customers with a new level of comfort and convenience, along with delivering increased efficiency and better operating economics.”

American’s 777-300ER is configured with three classes, featuring lie-flat seats in First and Business Class. The airplane also is equipped with the Panasonic eXConnect Wi-Fi system, which Boeing installed during production, to keep passengers connected while traveling internationally.

“This delivery demonstrates American’s commitment to transforming its fleet into one of the youngest and most fuel efficient in the industry,” said John Wojick, senior vice president, Global Sales, Boeing Commercial Airplanes. “The 777-300ER is the ideal airplane for American’s fleet renewal effort providing unparalleled operating economics, long-range capability, reliability and passenger comfort.”

The Boeing 777-300ER extends the 777 family’s span of capabilities, bringing twin-engine efficiency and reliability to the long-range market. The airplane is 19 percent lighter than its closest competitor, produces 22 percent less carbon dioxide per seat and costs 20 percent less to operate per seat. The airplane can seat up to 386 passengers in a three-class configuration and has a maximum range of 7,930 nautical miles. The 777 family is the world’s most successful twin-engine, twin-aisle airplane.

 




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

News Briefs July 11, 2014

Afghan aid is dropping, but how fast is too fast? Civilian assistance to Afghanistan was always slated to shrink with America’s military footprint, but U.S. aid officials were caught off guard when Congress became upset by testy relations with Afghan President Hamid Karzai and slashed civilian aid by 50 percent this year. War-weary lawmakers were...
 
 

Arianespace launches O3b satellites on Soyuz mission

July 10, at 3:55 pm local time in French Guiana, Arianespace successfully performed its second launch for O3b Networks, following the successful launch of the operator’s first four satellites last year. With this eighth Soyuz launch from the Guiana Space Center, all successful, Arianespace proves its long-term support for new operators and helps reduce the...
 
 
Air Force photograph by Samuel King Jr.

Hagel talks with F-35 pilots, maintainers at Eglin AFB

Air Force photograph by Samuel King Jr. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel speaks with reporters after touring the 33rd Fighter Wing and the F-35 Lightning II integrated training center at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., July 10, 2014. ...
 

 

General Dynamics to continue amphibious combat vehicle testing

General Dynamics Land Systems, a business unit of General Dynamics, is continuing work on an Amphibious Combat Vehicle solution for the U.S. Marine Corps. The recently awarded five-month contract extension, valued at $7 million, continues General Dynamics’ ongoing work to determine the best option for developing an affordable, survivable and high water speed ACV platform...
 
 
NASA/JPL image

NASA spacecraft sees further evidence of dry ice gullies on Mars

NASA/JPL image This pair of images covers one of many sites on Mars where researchers use the HiRISE camera on NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter to study changes in gullies on slopes. Changes such as the ones visible in ...
 
 
NASA/ESA image

Hubble spots spiral bridge of young stars linking two ancient galaxies

NASA/ESA image NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope photographed a 100,000-light-year-long structure that looks like a string of pearls twisted into a corkscrew shape winds around the cores of the two massive galaxies. The √¨pea...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>