Space

December 28, 2012

Boeing completes preliminary design review for Space Launch System core stage

Boeing weld technician Richard Oramous, weld engineer Tim Livengood and weld technician Gary Bennett (left to right) observe a Self Reacting Friction Stir Weld development test weld in progress at NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans in support of the SLS. Boeing and NASA on Dec. 20 completed the Preliminary Design Review for the Space Launch System core stage and avionics, validating the design of the rocket that will send humans beyond low Earth orbit to places like the moon, an asteroid and ultimately Mars.

Boeing and NASA on Dec. 20 completed the Preliminary Design Review for the Space Launch System core stage and avionics, validating the design of the rocket that will send humans beyond low Earth orbit to places like the moon, an asteroid and ultimately Mars.

The PDR is a comprehensive review that demonstrates that the design meets all system requirements within acceptable risk constraints, establishing approval for proceeding with detailed design. The first mission in 2017 will be an un-crewed loop around Earth’s moon, to be followed by a crewed mission.

“Design reuse and concurrent design and production planning helped us to quickly create a core stage preliminary design that integrates heritage and new designs, all less than a year from contract award. This is an important element of our schedule management approach,” said Jim Chilton, vice president for Boeing Exploration Launch Systems.

Boeing and NASA achieved three important milestones in the past year – System Requirements Review, Systems Design Review and now PDR. Boeing can now proceed to the Critical Design Review, the final step – expected in 2014 – that officially gives Boeing the authority to proceed into production. Boeing continues to develop production capability for the heavy-lift rocket at NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans.

“We are running ahead of schedule and we will use the extra time to ensure a safe and affordable rocket,” said Frank McCall, Boeing SLS deputy program manager.

The SLS program employs a growing Boeing Space Exploration workforce in Huntsville, Ala., and New Orleans, as well as in Houston; Huntington Beach and El Segundo, Calif.; Cleveland, Ohio; and Titusville, Fla.

Boeing weld engineer Tim Livengood confirms the setup on a friction stir weld test fixture at NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans in support of the SLS.

 




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Images courtesy of NASA/JHU-APL/SwRI

NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft stays course to Pluto

Images courtesy of NASA/JHU-APL/SwRI These images show the difference between two sets of 48 combined 10-second exposures with New Horizons’ Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) camera, taken at 8:40 UTC and 10:25 UTC...
 
 
Lockheed Martin photograph

Fourth Lockheed Martin-built MUOS secure comm satellite shipped

Lockheed Martin photograph On June 28, MUOS-4, the next satellite scheduled to join the U.S. Navy’s Mobile User Objective System secure communications network, shipped to Cape Canaveral from Lockheed Martin’s satellite manu...
 
 
Photograph courtesy of NASA/CXC/U. Wisconsin/S. Heinz

NASA’s Chandra captures x-ray echoes pinpointing distant neutron star

Photograph courtesy of NASA/CXC/U. Wisconsin/S. Heinz A light echo in X-rays detected by NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory has provided a rare opportunity to precisely measure the distance to an object on the other side of the...
 

 

Veteran NASA spacecraft nears 60,000th lap around Mars

NASA’s Mars Odyssey spacecraft will reach a major milestone June 23, when it completes its 60,000th orbit since arriving at the Red Planet in 2001. Named after the bestselling novel “2001: A Space Odyssey” by Arthur C. Clarke, Odyssey began orbiting Mars almost 14 years ago, on Oct. 23, 2001. On Dec. 15, 2010, it...
 
 
nasa-study

NASA selects six wild ideas in aviation for further study

NASA has selected six proposals to study transformative ideas that might expand what’s possible in aviation, shifting the boundary between fantastic and futuristic. During a day-long meeting in April, 17 teams pitched the...
 
 
NASA photograph

NASA signs agreement with Space Florida to operate historic landing facility

NASA photograph This aerial photo of the runway at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility looks north. Longer and wider than most commercial runways, it is 15,000 feet long, with 1,000-foot paved overruns on each end, and 300 feet wi...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>