Events

December 28, 2012

CURIOSITY creates virtual sun in a visual first to uncover its inner workings


‘Sun Storm’ premieres 9 p.m., Dec. 30 on Discovery Channel’s CURIOSITY series

The sun is entering a new phase of violent activity and massive storms could devastate our society.

A direct hit from a big solar storm could take out everything we rely on in our technological-driven world – from communications to banking to our water supply. But what do we really know about the sun and its inner workings? And are we prepared for the next major storm?

In a visual first, “Sun Storm,” airing Sunday, Dec. 30 at 9 p.m., EST/PST on Discovery Channel’s CURIOSITY series, will create a virtual sun using the latest scientific data from telescopes on earth and in space combined with the latest CG imaging techniques. The episode will follow one the world’s top astronomers on an expedition – from the sun’s nuclear engine at its heart to its surface and beyond.

Experts fear that a solar super storm is long overdue and there is a chance that some extreme space weather event could occur within the next couple of years.

“It’s the sun’s colossal size that makes it so dangerous to us,” said astronomer Phil Plait, who goes deep inside the virtual sun’s core and through its atmospheres. “Giant sunspots could unleash a super storm. The loops shooting out can reach hundreds of thousands of miles into space. And when one explodes, it’s like ten billion nuclear bombs detonating all at once.”

In 1859, Earth was hit by a super storm that was greater than anything we’ve known in our recent history. The light show was so vast it was seen all the way from the Arctic to the Caribbean. The fear is it could happen again, and soon.

In this latest episode, CURIOSITY taps some of the leading experts in the field to explore what’s really happening with the sun and what could be expected when the next solar super storm hits.

“Sun Storm” is produced by Big Wave Productions for Discovery Channel. CURIOSITY is overseen by Vice President, Development and Production Howard Swartz and Senior Vice President, Development and Production Simon Andreae.

 




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Headlines July 29, 2015

News: Lockheed F-35s reliability found wanting in shipboard testing – The Marine Corps’ version of Lockheed Martin’s F-35 fighter demonstrated poor reliability in a 12-day exercise at sea, according to the U.S. military’s top testing officer.   Business: Rockwell Collins to upgrade Boeing comms system – Rockwell Collins will upgrade the low-frequency transmi...
 
 

News Briefs July 29, 2015

U.S. Navy examines health concerns near Guantanamo court A complaint lodged with the Pentagon has prompted the U.S. Navy to look into the possible presence of anything that may cause cancer in a section of the base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, a military spokeswoman said July 28. The Navy Marine Corps Public Health Center and...
 
 
Air Force photograph by SrA. Betty R. Chevalier

New interrogation system installed on AWACS, more in pipeline

Air Force photograph by SrA. Betty R. Chevalier An E-3 Sentry AWACS from Tinker Air Force Base, Okla., prepares to land May 16, 2015. AWACS have the capability to detect enemy as well as friendly aircraft at great distances usi...
 

 

Remains of Pearl Harbor victims raised for identification

The military July 27 exhumed more caskets containing the unidentified remains of USS Oklahoma crew members killed in the 1941 bombing of Pearl Harbor. The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency disinterred five coffins from four grave sites at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, where they have rested for decades. The work is...
 
 
Boeing photograph

Boeing Oklahoma City expansion grows facilities, business presence

Boeing photograph July 29, Boeing broke ground on a new laboratory facility in Oklahoma City. Mayor Mick Cornett, Commissioner Brian Maughan, President of Boeing Global Services and Support Leanne Caret, Oklahoma Governor Mary ...
 
 

NASA awards contract to support agency’s human spaceflight programs

NASA has selected Wyle Laboratories Inc., of El Segundo, Calif., to provide biomedical, medical and health services in support of all human spaceflight programs at the agency’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. The work supports ongoing research aboard the International Space Station and helps enable the journey to Mars. The Human Health and Performance contract...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>