In the news...

January 14, 2013

News Briefs – January 14, 2013

U.S. mission in Afghanistan to shift to support role

President Barack Obama and Afghan President Hamid Karzai say the U.S. military mission in Afghanistan is expected to shift to a support role later this spring – a few months earlier than expected.

Obama and Karzai were speaking at a news conference Jan. 11 after meeting at the White House on the future of the U.S. role in Afghanistan and the 66,000 American troops serving there.

The leaders say in a joint statement that the military mission will shift from combat to support in the spring. That was originally expected to take place in the summer.

Most unilateral U.S. combat operations should end at that point, with U.S. forces pulling back their patrols from Afghan villages. AP

U.S. to search for World War II missing in Myanmar

The U.S. military is preparing its first search in eight years for remains of American soldiers lost in Myanmar during World War II.
The resumption of the search is a product of the revived U.S. ties with Myanmar after it initiated democratic reforms.

The Hawaii-based Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command said Jan. 11 that a coordination team will head to Myanmar Jan. 21 to prepare for a visit by investigators a month later.

About 730 Americans are missing, mostly U.S. air crews that went down in the rugged northern mountains while flying supplies from India to China.

Spokeswoman Michelle Thomas said investigators will spend three weeks in Yangon Division and Mandalay Division, pursuing leads. Another mission is planned for the summer, hopefully to gather enough information to send in recovery teams later. AP

Obama won’t support building ‘Death Star’

A Death Star won’t be a part of the U.S. military’s arsenal any time soon.

More than 34,000 people have signed an online petition calling on the Obama administration to build the ìStar Warsî inspired super-weapon to spur job growth and bolster national defense.

But in a posting Jan. 11 on the White House website, Paul Shawcross, an administration adviser on science and space, says a Death Star would cost too much to build – an estimated $850 quadrillion – at a time the White House is working to reduce the federal budget.

Besides, Shawcross says, the Obama administration ìdoes not support blowing up planets.

The U.S., Shawcross points out, is already involved in several out-of-this-world projects, including the International Space Station, which is currently orbiting Earth with a half-dozen astronauts. AP

Japan holds military drill aimed at island defense

Japan has conducted a military drill apparently aimed at bolstering defense of islands at the center of a territorial dispute with China.
The Defense Ministry says it was the first time the annual drill, held Jan. 13 near Tokyo, was aimed at island defense.

Defense Minister Itsunori Onodera said Japan must improve its military tactics in light of the dispute with China. He said Chinese aircraft and sea vessels have infringed upon Japanese territory in waters and airspace around the disputed East China Sea islands, called Senkaku in Japan.

China also claims the islands, calling them Diaoyu. The Japanese government’s purchase of the islands in September triggered violent anti-Japan protests across China.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has said his government will increase defense spending to strengthen defense of the islands. AP




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Headlines April 24, 2015

News: More than $1 billion in U.S. emergency reconstruction aid goes missing in Afghanistan - A total of $1.3 billion that the Pentagon shipped to its force commanders in Afghanistan between 2004 and 2014 for the most critical reconstruction projects can’t be accounted for by the Defense Department, 60 percent of all such spending under an...
 
 

News Briefs April 24, 2015

German defense minister: widely used rifle has no future A widely used assault rifle has “no future” with the German military in its current form, Germany’s defense minister said April 22, escalating a dispute over the weapon’s alleged shortcomings. Ursula von der Leyen said last month that a study showed the G36 rifle has a...
 
 
Army photograph

Composites key to tougher, lighter armaments

Army photograph XM-360 test firing at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., in 2007, is shown. The Army is on the cusp of revolutionizing materials that go into armament construction, making for stronger, lighter and more durable weapo...
 

 

Northrop Grumman signs long-term agreement with Raytheon

Northrop Grumman has entered a long-term agreement with Raytheon to supply its LN-200 Inertial Measurement Unit for Raytheon optical targeting systems. The long-term agreement with Raytheon’s Space and Airborne Systems business extends through 2018. The LN-200 provides camera stabilization on optical targeting systems that conduct long-range surveillance and target acquisition for various...
 
 

NTTR supports first F-35B integration into USMC’s weapons school exercise

The Nevada Test and Training Range was part of history April 21, when four U.S. Marine Corps-assigned F-35B Lightning IIs participated in its first Marine Corps’ Final Exercise of the Weapons and Tactics Instructor course on the NTTR’s ranges. The Final Exercise, or FINEX, is the capstone event to the U.S. Marine Corps Marine Aviation...
 
 
AAR-Textron

AAR awarded new contract from Bell Helicopter Textron to support T64 engines

AAR announced April 22 that Bell Helicopter Textron Inc. awarded its Defense Systems & Logistics business unit a contract providing warehouse and logistics services in support of upgrading T64 engines for the Bell V-280 Val...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>