Local

January 16, 2013

AERO Institute partners with AIAA to offer specialty courses for aerospace engineers

The AERO Institute in Palmdale, Calif., in partnership with The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, is offering two new classes geared for engineers and aerospace professionals at the AERO Institute, 38256 Sierra Highway, Suite A in Palmdale.

The classes are entitled “Optimal State Estimation” and “Mathematical Introduction to Integrated Navigations Systems with Applications” and will be held on Feb. 28 and March 1.

Registration and class costs are available at https://www.aiaa.org/SecondaryTwoColumn.aspx?id=591.

The “Optimal State Estimation” course is designed for engineers who want to estimate the states of a dynamic system. This includes electrical, aerospace, chemical, and mechanical engineers, but could also include engineers from other disciplines. This course will interest those who want to learn the basics, as well as those who want to learn about recent advances and research directions.

The class presents state estimation theory clearly and rigorously, providing the right balance of fundamentals, advanced material, and recent research results. After taking this course, the student will be able to confidently apply state estimation techniques in a variety of fields.

After being given a solid foundation in the fundmentals, students will be presented with a careful treatment of advanced topics, including H-infinity filtering, unscented filtering, high-order nonlinear filtering, particle filtering, constrained state estimation, reduced order filtering, robust Kalman filtering, and mixed Kalman/H-infinity filtering.

The “Mathematical Introduction to Integrated Navigations Systems with Applications” course is designed for those directly involved with the design, integration, and test and evaluation of Integrated Navigation Systems. It is assumed that the attendees have a background in mathematics including calculus.

This course is segmented into two parts. In the first part, elements of the basic mathematics, kinematics, equations describing navigation systems and their error models, aids to navigation, and Kalman filtering are reviewed. Detailed derivations are provided. The accompanying textbook provides exercises to expand the application of the materials presented.

Applications of the course material, presented in the first part, are presented in the second part for actual Integrated Navigation Systems. Examples of these systems are implemented in the MATLAB/Simulink ™ commercial product, and are provided for a hands-on experience in the use of the mathematical techniques developed.

The AIAA is the world’s largest technical society dedicated to the global aerospace profession. AIAA’s mission is to address the professional needs and interests of the past, current, and future aerospace workforce and to advance the state of aerospace science, engineering, technology, operations, and policy to benefit our global society. For more information, visit www.aiaa.org.

The AERO Institute® is a California non-profit partnership of individuals; Federal, State and Regional governments; commercial companies; academic institutions; and non-profits engaged in broad reaching research and operations programs as well as addressing the need for technically skilled workforce for the United States in the 21st century. To develop the necessary pipeline of students, we also support STEM education at all levels.

The Strategic Partners in the AERO are NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, NASA Ames Research Center, and the City of Palmdale, California. AERO works in close association with the NASA National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program to further leverage the public’s investment in higher education. Numerous colleges and universities have formed new partnerships with the AERO to make educational opportunities more accessible in the Antelope Valley. For more information, visit www.aeroi.org.

 




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